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William Mitchison (Mitcheson / Mitchelson)

1852 (Newcastle) -1923 (Newcastle) aged 71

Updated 23 October 2011

contact  John and Rosie Wells

 

 

stage name after 1880

Will Mitcham

Publisher: Francis Bros.& Day (1884)

( See also Buffalo Gals )

Many thanks to Max Tyler for pointing us in the direction of Will's obituary in The Performer newspaper:

 
We regret to announce the death of
Will Mitcham
No 399
Who passed away at Newcastle
Oct 4 1923
Our sincere sympathy is offered to his relatives and friends of our deceased brother
Mr Mitcham's is the 16th Death Levy due
on the 1923 book, and becomes payable on Monday next
 
_________________________________
 
The Performer,  October 10 1923
_________________________________

 

 

The story so far

Will Mitcham, the music hall performer, is believed to be the individual who summoned midwife Annie Kewitsch to Scarborough in 1902 to deliver a child.  She brought the child back to Leeds and registered it as her own in the name of William Michael Kewitsch.  Annie provided lodgings for theatricals in Leeds and her husband Bruno played piano in theatres and, later, in picture houses.

Family stories have told of William Michael's birth being connected with a Scottish father.  The music hall artist Will Mitcham was named specifically as the father by Annie Kewitsch.

For many years, efforts have been made to discover more about William Michael's birth parents and now it appears that a breakthrough has been made.

First, details about Will Mitcham. The 1871 census information showed a William Mitcheson, coalminer, b c1851 Newcastle on Tyne, who became a 'vocal musical professional' by the time of the 1881 census.

So far, the earliest evidence of his performances that we have found is in 1875, where he was described as a 'Popular Comic Character Vocalist and Tyneside Comedian, now in full tide of success',19 December 1875, The Era.

By 5 September 1880, he had posted a notice in The Era announcing his name change. 'Mr Will. Mitcham, (late WILL MITCHISON),  the Inimitable Vocal and Musical Speciality Artiste.  W. M. wishes to inform proprietors and managers that in future he will be known as Will Mitcham.'

On 8 May 1886, The Era contained the following report: 'Married by special licence at Christ Church, Westminster Bridge Road, Sunday May 2d, William Mitchelson, professionally known as Will Mitcham to Miss Harriet Sarah Ann Gaut, professionally known as Miss Maud Ross (of Maud and Charlie Ross)'. Because of her surname's misprint, she wrote in to add the correction 'HSA Gant, daughter of W Gant, late of Holmes and Gant' in the following week's newspaper.  Although Harriet corrected the spelling of her surname, she made no alteration to Will's surname spelling.

At the time of the marriage, Will is named as William Mitchelson, a bachelor aged twenty-eight, profession: vocalist, of 52 Clapham Road, son of John Mitchelson, farmer.  Harriet Sarah Ann Gant, a spinster aged nineteen, of no declared profession, living at 6 Portland Place, North Clapham Road, daughter of the late William George Gant, actor.  J Sparrow and G W Gant witnessed the ceremony.

Harriet S(arah) A(nn) Gant's birth was registered in the March qtr.1866 Shoreditch, London. She was the daughter of William Gant, formerly of 'Holmes and Gant', 'The representatives of the burnt cork' (description in review of the Museum Concert Hall show in Bolton) 'who joked, sang, and danced in the stage Ethiopian style' (review of The Cambridge, London, show in 1870). William George Gant died of syncope (shock) in the office of his agent, Hugh J Didcott ('Diddy', 1836 - 1909), on Saturday 17 September 1881, and he was buried in Finchley. At the time of his death, two of his four children were performing in music halls, his daughter as 'Maud Venner' and his son as 'Charles Ross'.

Initially, Harriet performed as 'Maud Ross' with her brother 'Charles Ross', aka 'Charlie' aka 'Charley', and they proved a popular combination, being described as 'infant wonders' (1882) and 'clever duettists' (1883).  Having carved out a successful career at the Gaiety Theatre during a three-year engagement, 'Charles' (William George Gant) died of the effects of consumption at 25 Partridge Road, Cardiff on Christmas Day 1893. At his death, the Western Mail commented that he had 'already gained brilliant success in his profession, and was in his private life cheerful and bright, being much beloved by all who knew him'.

Harriet used the name 'Maud Venner' later when performing as an actress rather than as a Serio-Comedienne / Guitarist / Tyrolean Vocalist / Ballad Singer / Top-Boot Dancer.   She and Will Mitcham toured Britain, delivering lively performances, and, also, they toured the USA and Canada. New York and Streator, Illinois, were mentioned specifically.  Harriet S A Mitcheson died on the 6th February 1922, reg March quarter 1922, Castle Ward, Northumberland. Will died on the 4 October 1923 in Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle.  (His daughter Maud reported his death and gave her address as 6 Regent Road, Gosforth, Northumberland, the same as her father's.)  In his will of 23 February 1922, Will described himself as 'gentleman', living at 6 Regent Road, Gosforth.  He left his real and personal estate to his daughter Maud Clara and appointed her as sole executrix of his will.  When Maud Clara was granted probate on the 9th November 1923, she was described as 'Maud Clara Lorimer of The Crown and Anchor Hotel, Braintree in the County of Essex, widow, daughter of deceased, the sole Executrix'.

***

In the March qtr.1887, the birth of Will and Harriet's daughter, Maud Clara, was registered at Lambeth as Maud Clara Mitchelson.

In the 1891 census, Maud Clara was staying in Lambeth with her widowed grandmother, Hannah E Gant; her unmarried uncles, John Gant, a CC secretary, William George Gant, singer; and her uncle George W Gant, shipping clerk, and his wife, Mary, and son, John W G Gant.

In the 1901 census Maud was with her music hall artist parents at 177 Harold Road, West Ham, London.

In 1905, Maud married John Gillespie Lorimer at Brixton Register Office.  John was also known as 'Jack' or 'Jock' and possibly represents the Scottish part of the story as he was born in Forres, Morayshire, Scotland in 1883, son of Alexander Walls Lorimer and Margaret Gillespie.  By trade a painter/decorator, he made his name on the music hall stage as the 'Scottish Comedian', aka 'The Hielan' Laddie', performing in full Highland dress, and as an oriental piper, just as his father-in-law, Will Mitcham, had done for many years. Like so many music hall performers of his time, such as former Hamilton miner, Harry Lauder, he probably started out professionally in music hall part-time, supported by his main day job.   It is believed that he and Maud did appear on the same bill together, Maud's stage name being 'Stella Stahl'.  A popular performer, he wrote and recorded his own songs.  When he visited New York, he was piped through the streets following the same experience of Harry Lauder. After his marked success in London in 1904, he took up residency in Brixton.

Stella Stahl

(Maud Clara Mitchison / Lorimer)

Jack and Stella Lorimer

On 12 March 1908, John and Maud's son, Maxwell George Lorimer, was born at 37 Glenshaw Mansions, Brixton Road, Brixton.  By the time he was two, it is said that he made his first appearance on stage, dressed in a kilt.  In 1916, as a result of a gas bomb dropped from a German Zeppelin L31 airship on Baytree Road, Brixton, his young brother, Dennis, and nurse 'Aunty' Betty Hobbs#

# (presumed wife of 'American soft shoe and buck dancer' 'You've only got to say what I say' Billy Hobbs , of Moore and Burgess minstrels, later, until 1900, with Mohawk, Moore and Burgess; presented with a portrait by Henry Dore at Gatti's in December 1900.  Two records have been found of Billy Hobbs, 'coon' impersonator and dancer, appearing at the Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead: 18 July 1910 ref Charles Taylor Collection, NFA, playbill ref 178R12.176, and also at the same theatre 3 November 1913, ref 178R12.217)

Following this information from PW:

‘Aunty Betty’ is actually Esther Jane Pepper, wife of Harvey Pepper (a music hall artist). Esther was 38 years old when she was killed at 19 Bay Tree Road, Brixton. Her death was registered in Lambeth, September  1916.

It has been discovered that Harvey Pepper, b1874 Stoke on Trent, married Hester Jane Coxhead, b1880 Reading, in Scarborough in 1900.  In 1901, they were living in rooms at 38 Albemarle Crescent in Scarborough with their 7 month old son Ivor Pepper.  Harvey was a Clothier's Manager as his father Silas was (recorded on the 1891 census).  The rest of the house was occupied by boarding house keeper Grace Frost and family.  David Briggs and family lived at no 39 and Mary Whittaker and family lived at no 40.

At the time of the 1911 census, Ivor was staying / living with other family members, but no trace has been found so far of either parent under the Hobbs or Pepper surnames.

Maxwell and his older brother, Alexander, survived, protected by their iron bedstead, which overturned with the explosion, pinning them underneath.   Their parents were working away from home at the time. Shortly afterwards, Maud left John Lorimer, taking Maxwell with her.  She moved in with  another performer, Harry Wallace, known as 'Harry Bentley' (of 'Burns and Bentley'), Maxwell's mentor and the source of his later surname, changed by deed poll, Max Wall.  According to Michael Bardell's 'Give Them Ale Enough: A History of Braintree and Bocking Pubs', between the two World Wars, Harry was the licensee of the Crown and Anchor pub in Market Place, Braintree, where they lived. Max attended Braintree's Manor Street School, which is now the site of Braintree and Bocking Museum.  Stella (as Max calls her in his autobiography) and Harry performed as 'Spence and Jocelyn'.  After Harry's death, on Max's 21st birthday, Stella lived with and later married (Maude C Lorimer, December Quarter 1931 Marylebone) 'Bill', William D Tringham, of The Happy Boys, and, later, one of Geraldo's guitarists.  Stella died in Middlesex (reg June Quarter 1961).

According to Samantha Ellis's Guardian article, (5 November 2003), later, Max 'followed in his grandmother's footsteps (she had been a famed clog and pedestal dancer), billed as 'The Boy with the Obedient Feet', but the patter soon eclipsed the hoofing'.  Presumably this could refer to his grandmother Harriet Mitchison (Maud Ross), who was well-known for her dancing.  Certainly, Max appears to have inherited the talents of the performers on both sides of his family, making his stage debut at the age of 14 as an acrobatic dancer in a pantomime.

In the 1911 census, Maud Lorimer (Stella), married six years, stated that she had had two live births, both of whom were still alive.  However, only one child (Maxwell) was living with her at the time of the census. 

Three sons were registered to Maud and John Lorimer: Dennis William Dominic ('Bunty', birth reg. March qtr. 1912, Lambeth; death reg. Sept. qtr. 1916, Lambeth); Maxwell George (birth reg. June qtr. 1908 Lambeth; following a fall at Simpson's restaurant in London, on 21 May 1990, he died at Westminster Hospital, London; buried Highgate Cemetery; on grave stone: ‘I believe that since My life began the most I’ve had is Just a Talent to Amuse’ (Noel Coward); survived by four sons, Michael, Melvin, Martin and Meredith, and a daughter, Maxine); and Alexander ('Alec', birth reg. Dec. qtr. 1906, West Derby, Liverpool).  In the 1911 census,  Alex was with his grandfather Alexander Lorimer at 13 The Laurels, Langton Road, Brixton. His uncle, George Lorimer aka 'Dodd', a clog maker born in Forres, was there too.

On 8 July 1920, Max's father, John Gillespie Lorimer, died as a result of TB (probably also heightened by excessive drinking during his career) and was buried in Tooting Cemetery.  In his will, dated 16 April 1917, he described himself as 'Gentleman' of 25 Somerleyton Road, Brixton, London.  He nominated his spinster sisters, Alexandrina Mary Lorimer (a music hall star known as 'Ina Lorimer'), and Margaret Lorimer (Max's Aunt Peggy), as executrixes of his will.  Charles A O'Shea and Patrick O'Shea, both of Clapham, witnessed the will.

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Family Data
 
 
MITCHISONs
  • John Mitcheson / Mitchison bc 1820 Northumberland, coalminer, son of William Mitcheson, married Margaret Atchison bc1824 Hexham, coalminer, daughter of Michael Atchison, on 7 July 1850 at St Nicholas, Newcastle upon Tyne, reg as Mitchison, Sep Q 1850 Newcastle.
1861 Census
1 Sams House, High Row, Chirton, Tynemouth
John Mitchison       (37) Lead works lab, b. Morpeth
Margaret Mitchison (36) b. Hexham
John Mitchison        (11) Scholar, b. Newcastle on Tyne
William Mitchison     (9) Scholar, b. Newcastle on Tyne
James Mitchison       (7) Scholar, b. Newcastle on Tyne Percy Main
George Mitchison     (4) Hylton, Durham
Joshua Mitchison     (4) Hylton, Durham
 
1871 Census
Blucher Pit, Wallbottle, Northumberland
John Mitcheson        (41?) Coalminer, b. Mitford
Margaret Mitcheson (46) Coalminer, b. Hexham
John Mitcheson        (21) Rolleyway man, b. Newcastle on Tyne
William Mitcheson    (19) Coalminer, b. Newcastle on Tyne
James Mitcheson      (17) Coal putter, b. Percy Main
George Mitcheson     (14) Coal putter, b. Dewley
Joshua Mitcheson      (14) Coal putter, b. Dewley
Septimus Mitcheson  (18) Scholar, b. Percy Main

1881 Census
22 Delival Terrace, Benwell, Newcastle, Northumberland
John Mitcheson (60) Coalminer, b. Bolam
Margaret Mitcheson (59) Coalminer, b. Hexam (Hexham)
John Mitcheson (31) Coalminer, b. Newcastle on Tyne
William Mitcheson (28) Vocal musical professional, b. Newcastle on Tyne
James Mitcheson (26) Coalminer, b. Percy Main
George Mitcheson (24) Coalminer, b. Newburn
Joshua Mitcheson (24) Coalminer, b. Newburn
Septimus Mitcheson (18) Coalminer, b. Percy Main

  • William Mitchelson married Harriet Sarah A Gant, reg June qtr.1886 Lambeth
  • Their daughter, Maud Clara Mitchelson / Mitchison, was born in 1887, birth registered March qtr.1887 Lambeth
1891 Census
19 Fentiman Road, Lambeth
Hannah E Gant (59) Shoreditch, widow
George W Gant (35) Shipping clerk, b. Shoreditch
Mary Gant         (35) b. Birmingham (wife of William G, ie George W)
John W G Gant (6) b. Clapham (son of Mary and William G)
Anne L A Gant (3) b Clapham (daughter of Mary and William G)
John Gant  (33) CC Secretary, b. Islington
William G Gant (22) Singer, b. Bolton
Maud Clara Michelon / Micheson (4) b. Clapham, granddaughter of Hannah E Gant
 
1901 Census: 'Gant' is recorded as 'Grand' / 'Grant'
177 Harold Road, West Ham, London.
George W Grant                      (43) Lock Lab, b. Shoreditch
Mary Grant                              (45) b. Birmingham
John W Grant                          (16) Pupil Teacher, b. Clapham
Alice B Grant                            (8)  b. Clapham
Hannah Grant                          (69) b.  Hackney
William Mitcheson                   (48) Music Hall Artist, b. Newcastle on Tyne  (1 thumb)
Harriet S. Mitcheson (nee Gant)(35) Music Hall Artist, b. London, Hoxton
Maud C. Mitcheson                  (14)  b. London, Clapham
William Samson                        (22) India rubber experimental worker, b. Culhampton Devon
 
29 May 1902, Date of birth at 27 Hope Street, Leeds, registered by Annie Kewitsch for William Michael Kewitsch (aka Mitcham) on 4 July 1902. In his late teens, his 'mother' told him that he was actually born in Scarborough and that his real parents were music hall performers and that his father was Will Mitcham. Annie (who was also a landlady for theatricals) said she had been the midwife. The names of Briggs and Whittaker were also mentioned in relation to the trip to Scarborough.  In the 1950s, William Michael changed his family's name to Mitcham.  William Michael Kewitsch / Mitcham is the grandfather of John Wells of this website.
 
  • Maud Clara Mitchison, b.1887 Lambeth, married John Gillespie Lorimer in September qtr 1905, Lambeth.
  • In the 1911 census, Harriet Mitchison ('Maud Ross'), Maud Clara Lorimer's mother, stated that she had only had one live birth.
  • Harriet S A Mitcheson,  death registered March qtr 1922 Castle Ward, Northumberland.
  • William Mitchison of 6 Regent Road, Gosforth, Northumberland, House Proprietor, died 4 October 1923, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle.  M.C. Lorimer, daughter, present at death, same address.
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GANTs
  • William George Gant b 6 November 1835 Islington, bap 29 November 1835 St Mary's Islington, was the son of John Gant, greengrocer of Bride Terrace (1835), a widower when he married widow Harriet Harpham, bc1803, at St Luke's, Old Street, on 31 January 1833.  On 4 November 1858 at St James's Church, Shoreditch, William George Gant married Hannah Elizabeth Williamson b 3 July 1831, bap 14 August 1831 St Leonard's Shoreditch, daughter of William and Mary Williamson of Brunswick Street.  William George Gant's profession was described as warehouseman and his father was dead by that time, but Hannah's father, William Williamson, was described as a gentleman's bootmaker.
  • Harriet S(arah) A(nn) Gant, born 27 November 1865 Hoxton, bap 7 Jan 1866 St John the Baptist Hoxton, birth reg. March qtr.1866 Shoreditch, London (daughter of William George Gant, clerk of 4 High Street (also, ?later, of 'Holmes and Gant', 'The representatives of the burnt cork' (description in review of the Museum Concert Hall show in Bolton) 'who joked, sang, and danced in the stage Ethiopian style' (review of The Cambridge, London, show in 1870). William George Gant died of syncope in the office of his agent, H J Didcott, on Saturday 17 September 1881 and was buried in Finchley.  At the time of his death, two of his four children were performing, his daughter Harriet as Maud Venner and his son William George as Charles Ross at music halls.)
1871 Census
8 Southampton Street, Clerkenwell
William G Gant (35) Professional singer and dancer, b. Islington
Hannah E Gant  (39) b. Hackney
George W  Gant (13) Scholar, b. Shoreditch
John Gant          (12) b. Islington
Harriet Gant         (5) b. Hoxton
William G Gant    (2) b. Bolton
 
1881 Census
105 Stockwell Street, Glasgow
Walter White      (36) Actor, comedian
Margaret White   (40) Actor, comedian
Boarders:
William G Gant  (42) Actor, comedian
Hannah E Gant  (44) Actor, comedian
Harriet Gant       (15) Actor, comedian
William G Gant  (11) Scholar
Thomas Sandford (27) Actor, comedian
Clara Sandford     (24) Actor, comedian
Christina Sandford (4)
Patrick Murtagh   (12) Scholar, b. Ireland
 
1891 Census
19 Fentiman Road, Lambeth
Hannah E Gant (59) Shoreditch, widow
George W Gant (35) Shipping clerk, b. Shoreditch
Mary Gant         (35) b. Birmingham (wife of William G, ie George W)
John W G Gant (6) b. Clapham (son of Mary and William G)
Anne L A Gant (3) b Clapham (daughter of Mary and William G)
John Gant  (33) CC Secretary, b. Islington
William G Gant (22) Singer, b. Bolton
Maud Clara Michelon / Micheson (4) b. Clapham, granddaughter of Hannah E Gant
 
1901 Census: 'Gant' is recorded as 'Grand' / 'Grant'
177 Harold Road, West Ham, London.
George W Grant                      (43) Lock Lab, b. Shoreditch
Mary Grant                              (45) b. Birmingham
John W Grant                          (16) Pupil Teacher, b. Clapham
Alice B Grant                            (8)  b. Clapham
Hannah Grant                          (69) b.  Hackney
William Mitcheson                   (48) Music Hall Artist, b. Newcastle on Tyne  (1 thumb)
Harriet S. Mitcheson (nee Gant)(35) Music Hall Artist, b. London, Hoxton
Maud C. Mitcheson                  (14)  b. London, Clapham
William Samson                        (22) India rubber experimental worker, b. Culhampton Devon
 
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LORIMERs
 
Following recent contact by the daughter and granddaughters of Edith Marion Estelle Lorimer, daughter of James Peter Lorimer**, we have been able to discover more information about this family, which we are posting on these pages.  We acknowledge the help of Carolyn, Shannon and Holly with grateful thanks!
  • Alexander Walls Lorimer was born on 22 March 1856 Strichen, Aberdeenshire, son of George Lorimer, agricultural labourer, and Janet Simpson b1832 Rathen.  George Lorimer was the son of John Lorimer and Isobel PhilipJanet Simpson's parents were George Simpson (a dancing master) and Anne Mitchel.
  • Alexander had seven other siblings: James Peter**, Anne, William Mitchell, John McIntosh, George (died at 10), Elizabeth Harey Purse and, it is believed, Margaret Philip.
  • Alexander W Lorimer married Margaret Gillespie bc1862 Turriff.  Their 4 known children were: George 'aka Dodd' Lorimer bc1882 Forres, a clog maker; John aka Jack Gillespie Lorimer bc1883 Forres; Margaret Mary Lorimer bc1886 Aberdeen, a photographer's assistant; Alexandrina aka 'Ina' Lorimer bc1895 Glasgow, music hall star.
  • Alexander Walls Lorimer, of 25 Somer-Leyton Road, Brixton, died 8 April 1922.  Admons London 21 August 1923 to widow Margaret.  Margaret Gillespie Lorimer, widow, of 25 Somer-Leyton Road, Brixton, died 15 May 1933.  Admons with will, 17 June, London, to George Lorimer, factory hand.
Alexander Lorimer Hotel boots
 
1891 Census
68 Holburn Street, Aberdeen
Alexander W Lorimer Hotel boots
Margaret Lorimer
George Lorimer Scholar
John G Lorimer
Margaret Lorimer 
Helen Gillespie Factory Worker (sister-in-law)
Matilda Gillespie Scholar (sister-in-law)
 
1901 Census
11 Chisholm Street, Glasgow
Alexander W Lorimer  (43) Incandescent light fitter, b. Strichen Aberdeenshire
Margaret G Lorimer     (39) b. Turriff Aberdeenshire
John G Lorimer            (19 ) Painter, b. Forres, Morayshire
George Lorimer            (19) Clog Maker, b. Forres
Margaret Lorimer         (15) Photographer's Assistant, b. Aberdeen
Alexandrina Mary Lorimer(6) b. Glasgow
William M Lorimer        (47 ) Time Keeper, b Strichen, (Alexander's brother)
 
1911 Census
13 The Laurels, Langton Road, Brixton, London
Alexander Lorimer Independent means, b. Strichen Aberdeenshire
Margaret Lorimer                                  b. Turriff Aberdeenshire
George Lorimer Clog Maker                   b. Forres
Alex Lorimer                                   (4), b. Liverpool, grandson  (Alexander b.1906, son of Maud and Jack Lorimer)
  • In 1914, Maud and Jack Lorimer were living at 'The Wee Hoose', Endymion Road, Brixton Hill.
  • Alexandrina Mary Lorimer was born 21 Jan 1895 at 11 Chisholm Street, Glasgow.  She was known as 'Ina'.  In a press notice from the The Gravesend Reporter, 'Little Ina' Lorimer's first performance in England on 23 June 1906 was well received when she appeared on The Grand's bill and delighted with her dancing and humour.  Interestingly, in the background as she performed were the 4 cups and 120 medals that she had already won in her short career.
Example of John Gillespie Lorimer's recording:
  1. Jack Lorimer’s 'Hello there, MacIntyre!' MP3 file (2-4 MB) 1909 - University of California, Santa Barbara Library
  2. Jack Lorimer’s 'Three Jolly Scotchmen', recorded in 1906 (Edison cylinder 13552) and 1908 (Jumbo 207)
  3. Jack Lorimer's 'I've Lost My Little Dog', pub 1907 by Maurice Shapiro, New York
  4. Jack Lorimer and W. Hyde's 'A Sprig of Heather' pub 1907, Francis, Day and Hunter, London
  5. Jack Lorimer and W. Hyde's 'The Wee Aberdonian'. pub 1906, Shapiro, von Tilzer Music Co, London
  6. Others are listed on: http://www.fredgodfreysongs.ca/Scottish_Songs.htm
  7. Glasgow Uni Special Collections: Scottish Theatre Collection Ref: GB 247 STA JLC PP 106 Title:  Jack Lorimer the Highland Laddie: Full length view. Postcard

 

USEFUL LINKS

If you know of a useful relevant site that I have not included, please contact  John and Rosie Wells

 

V&A Theatre Collections Mander and Mitchenson Theatre Collection

Theatre Research Links

Very Useful!

Theatres Trust

Footlight Notes

1850s - 1920s

Scottish Theatre Archive (Glasgow University) Scottish Music Hall Society Sounds of the Music Hall British Music Hall Society Music Hall Performers (British)
The Golden Age of Theatre (1880 - 1920):

Postcards, Playbills, Theatre Programmes

Scottish Showbusiness Benevolent Fund Scottish Theatre Links Encyclopaedia of the British Music Hall Cylinders on the Web
Musicals The Society for Theatre Research Bravo Encore Theatre Programmes Evanion Catalogue

Backstage

Michael Kilgarriff

National Theatre of Variety

+

Index Page

Grand Order of Water Rats

 About Music Halls

Wikipedia Music Halls

Excellent links and further reading

Entertainment Artistes' Benevolent Fund

London Music Halls

Bristol University Theatre Archive

Theatre UK Mailing List

Hiss and Boo

Music Halls

Fun Fairs

National Fairground Archive        

Sheffield University: contains useful links

The Sheetmusic Warehouse

Music Hall Artistes' Railway Association

Ellen Terry's Rail Pass

Music Hall Artistes' Commemorative Plaques

Equity

Rogues and Vagabonds

The English Music Hall

Footlight Notes

Playbills, Programmes and Postcards

Rare Tunes Archive

Music Hall Studies

It's Behind You: Pantomime

Many links!

History of Pantomime

Lost Lives: George Grant aka George Wild Galvin aka Dan Leno

See also Harry Relph aka Little Tich

The Royal Theatrical Fund

Useful Links

V&A Links (1)

V&A Links (2)

SIBMAS

International Directory of Performing Arts Collections and Institutions

East London Theatre Archive

University of Bristol Theatre Collection
 

BOOKS

'Scotland and the Music Hall, 1850-1914' By Paul Maloney

Music Hall Warriors: A history of the variety artistes trade union (1906-1967)
By Peter Honri

V&A Music Hall and Variety Reading Lists

JOURNAL: Early Popular Visual Culture
 

 

 

Reviews and Advertisements

about the appearances / performances of

  • William Gant of Holmes and Gant;

  • Will Mitchison aka Will Mitcham;

  • Harriet Sarah Ann Gant aka Maud(e) Ross / Harriet Mitchison / Maud Venner (some references to 'Maud Venner' may refer to a different individual who used that stage name);

  • William George Gant aka Charlie/Charley Ross (only a few examples of his many appearances have been cited on this page so far);

  • Maud Clara Mitchison aka Maud Lorimer / Stella Stahl / Jocelyn of Spence and Jocelyn;

  • John Gillespie Lorimer aka John / Jack /Jock Lorimer.

1868 - 1874

1868

26 April 1868, The Era: 'Gant and Holmes (American duettists) are a talented pair' Thornton's Varieties, Leeds.

10 May 1868, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant are representatives of the "burnt cork".'  Museum Concert Hall, Bolton.

27 December 1868, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant give a laughable American entertainment.' Crystal Palace Concert Hall, Birmingham.

1869

17 August 1869, Liverpool Mercury: Messrs Holmes and Gant, New Star Music Hall.

28 November 1869, The Era: Holmes and Gant, Surrey Music Hall, Barnsley.

1870

16 January 1870, The Era: Holmes and Gant, 'roars of laughter', Alhambra, Hull.

22 February 1870, Liverpool Mercury: Messrs Holmes and Gant, New Star Music Hall, Liverpool.

24 April 1870, The Era: 'Holmes and Gant are good negro comedians, and retail their jokes capitally.'

1 May 1870, The Era: Holmes and Gant, The Sun, London.

15 May 1870, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant who joked, sang, and danced in the stage Ethiopian style', The Cambridge, London.  Also at The Sun.

29 May 1870, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Cambridge, London.

5 June 1870, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Royal, Holborn, London.

12 June 1870, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, 'in a peculiar display of sable humour', The Marylebone, London.

26 June 1870, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Arboretum Anniversary, Derby.

1871

1 January 1871, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Marylebone; 'Messrs Holmes and Gant in an Ethiopian entertainment certainly redeem the declining fame of the black opera".  They are excruciatingly funny; they speak nonsense but it is good; they speak riddles, but they are ingenious; they sing and do so well. let managers look to their laurels and secure them.' The Sun, Knightsbridge, London.

29 January 1871, Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Sun, Knightsbridge, London.

12 February 1871, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Marylebone and The Sun.

30 April 1871, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Cambridge.

1872

7 January 1872, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant succeed in eliciting roars of laughter' , South London Palace; Wilton's, and Star, London.

28 January 1872, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant, the amusing Negro delineators, excited loud laughter by their droll doings', The Oxford, London.

14 April 1872, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant at Mr Jolly John Nash's Benefit, The Canterbury, London.

5 May 1872, The Era: 'burlesque entertainment of Messrs Holmes and Gant', St Patrick's Auxiliary Schools; 'a laughable sketch called The Music Lesson', The Oxford, London.

7 July 1872, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Crystal Palace Concert Hall, Birmingham.

28 July 1872, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Royal Music Hall, Glasgow.

8 September 1872, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Southminster Theatre, Edinburgh.

3 / 10 November 1872, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant leased Barnsley Mechanics Hall to put on a short season of shows involving themselves and other performers, which proved popular with their audiences.

1873

5 January 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Marylebone; The Canterbury.

19 January 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Marylebone.

9 February 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Canterbury.

23 February 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Marylebone.

16 / 30 March 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Marylebone.

13 April 1873, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant asked and answered or gave up conundrums', The Grecian.

27 April 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant,  The Canterbury.

4 May 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant,  The Canterbury.

25 May 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Sam Collins's music hall, London , Mr H Watts's Benefit

I June 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, 'The laughable blundering on both sides caused infinite merriment to the audience.' The Sun Music Hall.

8 June 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, 'All these performers have been greeted with cheers and recalls, which show that their productions have lost none of their old popularity, and that there is still a large proportion of the hard working public who thoroughly enjoy Music Hall performances.'  Gatti's, London.

29 June 1873, The Era: 'Messrs Holmes and Gant , in their Ethiopian waggeries'  were as acceptable as ever.' London Pavilion.

13 July 1873, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The London Pavilion.

15 February 1874, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, Southminster Theatre, Edinburgh.

22 March 1874, The Era: Messrs Holmes and Gant, The Alhambra, Bradford.

1875 -1879

1875

19 December 1875, The Era: Will Mitcheson'Popular Comic Character Vocalist and Tyneside Comedian, now in full tide of success', New Tyne Music Hall, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, extended engagement to 9 weeks in total.  Signalled his availability in Feb 1876.

1876

26 November 1876, The Era: Will Mitcheson: 'the Great Comic Character and Vocalist', Northumberland Music Hall, North Shields, Durham Music Hall, South Shields. 'The greatest hit ever known' who performed 7 songs in one turn.  Signalled availability for 12 days from 8 Jan 1877.

3 December 1876, The Era: 'Mr. Will Mitcheson, the Celebrated Comedian, Vocalist, and Author, just finished most successful engagement ever known at Northumberland, North Shields, and Durham Music Hall, South Shields.  Monday next, Theatre Royal, Bishop Auckland.  Mitcheson is a Success everywhere. Address, en route. Kind regards to friends."

Star Theatre, Stockton>

1877

7 January 1877, The Era: Advertisement described WM as a 'character comique and versatile artiste'  'New and original business, without the slightest vulgarity'.  He was recommended by Theodore Heaton.  When free after his next engagement, he was looking for work preferably in Ireland.

WM: > Oxford, Middlesbrough

16 January 1877, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): WM:

WM: > Grafton Theatre of Varieties the following week

25 January 1877, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): WM: Fourth appearance, described as 'Comic Vocalist, Author and Dancer'

31 January 1877, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): Last week of Will's appearance at Grafton Theatre of Varieties

27 April 1877, Aberdeen Weekly Journal: WM: McFarland's Grand Music Hall

17 June 1877, The Era: Will is billed as a 'Tyneside comic', Steam Clock Music Hall, Birmingham

WM: >Alhambra, Barrow-in-Furness 12 nights

26 August 1877, The Era: 'Will Mitchison is an excellent comic'

2 September 1877, The Era: WM: 'Musical Comedian and Comic Vocalist'

WM: >Pullan's, Bradford

WM: >Odd Fellows' Hall, Halifax

1878

20 January 1878, The Era: WM: 'the People's Comedian, Vocalist, and Instrumentalist' 'Good Agent Required'

WM: > Thornton's Varieties, Leeds WM: > Princess's Palace, Middlesbrough.

28 April 1878, The Era: WM: 'Character Comic vocalist and Instrumentalist, in his great Impersonations of the Street Musician, with solos on the Cornet and the Whistle'  at Wear Music Hall, Sunderland for 3 weeks

5 May 1878, The Era: Another ad showed that WM's popularity had secured an additional two weeks in Sunderland.  Now stipulating bookings at 'First-class halls only'

WM: >Oxford Theatre of Varieties, Brighton

20 August 1878, Sussex Daily News: The newspaper review described WM: as 'another fresh face, [who] has a budget of new and pleasing comic songs, and his humorous way of rendering them created additional mirth.  During his songs he plays some capital selections on the cornet and metallic tube, showing that he is possessed of  instrumental as well as vocal ability.'

1 September 1878,The EraWM's ad is now entitled 'Willie the Whistler' and stress is placed on his performance 'The Bold Bugler', words by Oswald Lee Esq and music by Alfred Lee Esq  'Many thanks to dashing Dunbar for recommendation'

WM: >Mechanics', Hull

8 September 1878, The Era: WM's ad continues to build on his success:  'All New and Original songs by the best Authors, introducing Musical Selections on the Cornet and the Fife''  Alfred Lee is now being asked to send on music.

15 September 1878,The Era: WM:  'No vacant dates this year' . 1879 is looking promising and so the request for first-class halls reappears with a reminder of 'no agent'.

WM: >Theatre Royal, Dewsbury

13 October 1878, The Era: Will Mitcheson is asked to write (in an ad for Mr and Mrs Tom Arnold, the great comic duettists).

20 October 1878, The Era: Finishing run at People's, Manchester where WM claims to have had 'unbounded success'  Another request for Alfred Lee to communicate.

WM: >Royal Pavilion, Sheffield

1879

3 January 1879, Aberdeen Weekly Journal: WM: 'variety entertainer', McFarland's Grand Music Hall

5 January 1879, The Era: 'the Gentleman Comique',  McFarland's Grand Music Hall review of Will's performance:  'deservedly successful in comic songs and pipe-playing'

6 January 1879, Aberdeen Weekly Journal: 'Whistling Willie' now announces that he has been performing in Scotland for 15 weeks with 'Gigantic success at the Saturday evening concerts' and rebooking for the next season.  His postal contact address is given as the post office, Uddington, NB

2 March 1879, The Era: Wear Music Hall, Sunderland, WM's fourth engagement there with re-engagement for the next season.

WM: >Allen's Varieties, Burnley

16 March 1879, The Era: Will Mitcheson, comic, is appearing at Wear Music Hall.  Another description appears, although not so catchy at 'Whistling Willie'!: 'the Kerbstone Joggerer' . Another request for Oswald Lee to communicate.

WM: >Effingham Hall, Rotherham

13 April 1879, The Era: WM: Star Music Hall Carlisle

11 May 1879, The Era: WM: Request for bookings.  Allen's Varieties, Burnley:  review: Will is described as a 'character vocalist and whistler' whose first appearance raised a 'hearty' welcome.

18 May 1879, The Era: WM: Request for bookings

15 June 1879, The Era: WM: 'a comic of considerable ability' who was 'greeted with enthusiastic appreciation' (Oxford Music Hall, Brighton)

WM: >Gordon's, Southampton

22 June 1879, The Era: WM: 'a comedian of sterling talent'

29 June 1879, The Era: WM: Gordon's, Southampton

24 August 1879, The Era: 'Whistling Willie, the Bold Bugler': 3 weeks at the Harp Lounge, Ramsgate

1 September 1879 onwards: WM: Circus Varieties, Hanley (with G. Leybourne  Co.)

7 September 1879, The Era: 'whistling Willie' 'a capital character singer, and takes well' Imperial Theatre, Hanley

14 September 1879, The Era: WM: Alexandra Hall, Hanley

9 October 1879, Manchester Sporting Chronicle: People's, Manchester: WM: 'a capital all-round artiste, and he has become quite a favourite, and there is no doubt that as a comedy, vocal, and musical entertainer there are few better'

19 October 1879, The Era: WM: 'Great Success', Scotia Music Hall, Glasgow

1880 -1885

1880

4 January 1880, The Era: WM: McFarland's Music Hall > Opera House, Dundee

13 January 1880, Dundee Evening Telegraph: Will Mitchison 'has achieved a gratifying success since his first appearance on Monday last, and his various efforts to please are received with loud and enthusiastic applause.  The versatile nature of Mr Mitchison's performances is very remarkable, as he is equally at home in singing a comic song or giving a solo on the occarini or the cornet.'

18 January 1880, The Era: Will appears to be making a name for himself because of his varied talents. Operetta House Dundee; review: Will's 'versatile entertainment is very remarkable'.

WM: >Theatre Royal, Paisley

6 March 1880, Blyth Weekly News: The Theatre Royal, Blyth, viewed Will as an old favourite  who 'has made great improvement during his absence, and got an enthusiastic reception, and deservingly so.  He is a host in himself and keeps the audience in roars of laughter.  Some of his old acquaintances can hardly realise the progress he has made, his performance on the various instruments is something marvellous.  Great credit is due to him for the attention he has given to his profession.  It may be a long time before he will be at Blyth again, and we would recommend our readers not to miss this treat.'

4 April 1880, The Era: WM: 'The Inimitable Musical Comique', Alhambra Palace, Hull

11 April 1880, The Era: WM: 'the Music Man. Great Success', Alhambra Palace, Hull

18 April 1880, The Era: Rehearsal posting included Will Mitchison for Alhambra, Blackburn and Star Theatre, Darwen

11 July 1880, The Era: Birmingham Concert Hall had attracted good houses with a company that included Will Mitchison.

5 September 1880, The Era: 'Mr Will. Mitcham, (late WILL MITCHISON),  the Inimitable Vocal and Musical Speciality Artiste.  W.M. wishes to inform proprietors and managers that in future he will be known as Will Mitcham.' Harp Lounge, Ramsgate.

12 September 1880, The Era: WM: 3rd week at Harp Lounge, Ramsgate.

17 October 1880, The Era: "Mr W Mitcham (late Mitchison) unbounded success, Barnard's Chatham.  W. Mitcham will make his first appearance in London, at the Bedford, October 25th. W. Mitcham has no agent." [This refers to the Bedford North-Western Palace of Varieties, Camden Town where a new company included Will Mitcham - "First appearance in London".]

31 October 1880, The Era: The Bedford, London: WM:  "appeared first as a Jack Tar, and cheerily sang "Sailor William will be true to thee".  He next came forward wearing the uniform of a Grenadier bugler.  besides singing "March, March" etc, he gave specimens of bugle calls.  Subsequently he represented a street musician, who calls himself "Tin Whistle Tom". He played cleverly on whistles and an ocarina, and executed a solo on the cornet admirably.  Mr Mitcham is an amusing humorist, as well as an expert instrumentalist."

November 1880: WM:  appeared at Scotia and Brown's, Glasgow, where his reviews from the Bedford were quoted in advertisements.

26 December 1880, The Era: "Mr. Will Mitcham, the Inimitable Vocal and Musical Speciality Entertainer, Private and Special Concerts, Glasgow.  Mr Will Mitcham, London , Easter 1881, Three Halls.  Agent A. Maynard"

1881

January 1881, Greenock Advertiser: "Mr Will Mitcham was decidedly the hero of the evening, his singing and solos being received with great enthusiasm"

12 March 1881, The Era: Gaiety Music Hall, Dumfries: Will Mitcham was clearly a top star at this music hall if the review can be believed: he "displays versatility both as a vocal and instrumental artist".

21 & 28 May 1881, The Era: WM: Sun Music Hall, Knightsbridge: 'vocal and instrumental comic'

4 June 1881, The Era: Sun Music Hall, Knightsbridge: "Mr Will Mitcham represented a rustic, singing of everybody and everything about the farm being "Laughing mad".  He afterwards appeared in military uniform and carrying the British standard, which he planted on the stage.  He sang of "The Bugle's Call", and gave specimens of his skill as a performer on the instrument to which his song referred which evoked loud applause.  As "Tin Whistle Tom" he played on an ocarina and a tea-kettle and on two whistles at the same time, and talked facetiously and acted comically."

2 July 1881, The Era: The Middlesex:  As well as WM's rustic act and his brilliant bugling, he also imitated a Milanese piper, performed on the bagpipes and "showed how he serenaded a girl by singing "Come to the window, Nell!" and playing a pipe"

?1881, Poster from South London Palace, including Maud and Charles Ross 'The Juvenile Gems'

8 October 1881, The Era: Maud Venner and Charlie Ross, Harwood's;  South London; Hoxton Varieties; Marylebone.  Business Director: Hugh J Didcott

15 October 1881, The Era: Maud Venner and Charlie Ross, ad re 6.45: Harwood's;  7.30: Middlesex; 8.15: South London; 9.15: Hoxton Varieties; 10.20: Marylebone.  Business Director: Hugh J Didcott

12 November 1881, The Era: Maud Venner and Charlie Ross, ad re 8.15: South London; 9.45: Britannia Theatre; 11.00: Collins's

31 Dec 1881, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham, The London Pavilion

1882

22 April 1882 Shoreditch Town Hall, Benefit for Arthur Lloyd included Will Mitcham, programme at East London Theatre Archive

6 May 1882, The Era: Maud and Charley Ross "talented duettists and dancers", Star theatre, Ashton

13 May 1882, The Era: "Mr Will Mitcham the inimitable Vocal and Musical Comique, Resting, Resting, Resting    Address A Maynard 6 York Road, Lambeth"

1882, Poster from South London Palace, including Maud and Charley Ross 'The Infant Wonders', 'The latter of whom will give his inimitable imitation of Chirgwin'

June 1882, Poster from South London Palace, Lambeth, including Maud and Charley Ross

24 July 1882, East London Theatre Archive: Programme for 'The widow and orphans, or, Faith, hope & charity', written by C.H. Hazlewood, at Britannia Theatre, Hoxton, including Maud and Charley Ross

7 September 1882, Liverpool Echo: First appearance at the New Star Music Hall of Maud and Charley Ross, "The Little Gem and miniature white-eyed musical kaffir"

9 September 1882, Liverpool Mercury: New Star Music Hall: "The duettists Maud and Charley Ross usually secure a well deserved encore.."

16 September 1882: as above, last night of two performers

4 November 1882, The Era: "Mr. Will Mitcham who made quite a striking figure as a Highlander in full military uniform bearing a standard, sang well and played on the bugle finely."

29 November 1882, Poster from London Pavilion, Mr Sam Adams's Annual Benefit included Will Mitcham as well as Maud and Charles Ross on the bill

6 December 1882, Evanion Catalogue from Middlesex Music Hall, included Maud and Charley Ross

16, 23, 30 Dec 1882, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham, The London Pavilion

16 December 1882, East London Theatre Archive: Shoreditch Town Hall Programme  included Maud and Charley Ross, 'vocal duets and graceful dances by'

30 December 1882, Poster from London Pavilion, included Will Mitcham

30 December 1882: Announcement of the opening of Robert Reece and Alfred Thompson's The Yellow Dwarf at Her Majesty's Theatre, Maud Ross in the cast

1883

6 January 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham appearing at The London Pavilion (ad)

13 January 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham mentioned as part of cast in review of The Pavilion (London) show and also The Bedford where Will is described as 'a musician who invests his instrumental solos with much "artistic merit", and his admirable renderings on the Swiss pipe of an obbligato from Rossini's opera William Tell, and Sir Henry Bishop's Bid Me Discourse proclaimed the possession by him of executive ability and cultivated taste, the audience both listening intently and applauding rapturously.'

20, 27 January 1883, The Era: Ad from London Pavilion, included Will Mitcham

3 February 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham is very busy as this evening's schedule of appearances shows! London Pavilion 7.35, Royal 8.35, Town Hall Shoreditch 9.30

10 February 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham at The South London Palace is described in a review as a performer whose 'versatility is deserving of all commendation'.

10, 17, 24 February 1883, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham at The London Pavilion

17 February 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham 'appeared in military costume as a Highlander, sang in praise of Wolseley, and others who were engaged in the late war in Egypt, and played on a bugle finely. He also performed skilfully and amusingly as an Italian piper.'

21 February 1883, Poster from South London Palace, included Will Mitcham

24 February 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham appearing at The London Pavilion (ad)

3 March 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham appearing at The Royal, Holborn as 'an instrumental comedian'

3, 10, 17 March 1883, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham appearing at

5 March 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham appeared at a benefit for Miss Lucie Thomas at the Central Hall

10 March 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham appearing at The Royal, Holborn as 'an instrumental comedian', and at the London Pavilion

10 March 1883, The Era: Maude and Charlie Ross from Her Majesty's Theatre at Bedford Palace of Varieties, Camden Town.

17 March 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham sang a song at Arthur Lloyd's benefit at The London Pavilion. Also appeared there and at the royal and at Gatti's in the Road.

24 March 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham, a capital instrumental comedian' who gave 'a satisfactory display of his powers' included in a review of the show at The Royal, London

24 April 1883, Liverpool Mercury: Will Mitcham to appear in New Star music Hall the following week.

5 May 1883, The Era: Will Mitcham as a comic at The Prince of Wales Theatre, Birkenhead.

19 May 1883, Birkenhead Advertiser: "Mr Will Mitcham, as usual, brought down the house with his songs and accompaniments on the different instruments which he is such a perfect master of, his solo on the cornet deserving special mention."

26 May 1883, The Era: "Mr. Will Mitcham, the great Vocal and Musical Speciality Comique, finished one of the most successful engagements ever known at The Star Musical Hall, Liverpool, four weeks Monday next, Circus Varieties, Warrington."

July 1883, Poster  from London Pavilion, included Will Mitcham .

11 August 1883, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle: Will Mitcham, 'The Geat Vocal and Musical Entertainer' was advertised to appear from 13 August at the Amphitheatre, Portsmouth

18 August 1883, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle: Will Mitcham, 'The Geat Vocal and Musical Entertainer' was advertised to appear from 20 August at the Amphitheatre, Portsmouth

24 December 1883, Poster from Trocadero and The Eden Theatre of London, Piccadilly, including Maud and Charlie Ross

1884

Activities in 1884?

1885

7 February 1885, The Era: "Maud and Charley Ross were evidently great favourites with the audience, as they deserved to be.."

4 April 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham was described as being in America. " Big success in a big country.  Address, care of Clipper, or Sporting and Theatrical Journal, New York."

By 30 May 1885, Will had returned as The Era reported: "Returns from America per SS City of Chicago May 24th, after  a most successful tour of the United States and Canada."  Work had to be arranged and so "Will Mitcham is at liberty to arrange for first class Music Halls, Theatres, Aquariums, etc., for the Summer season.  Offers invited for early dates.  New songs written by J. F. Mitchell, composed by Will Mitcham, and duly perfected."   Titles: "She took up hat and overcoat" aka "Room enough for two"; "Don't you wish you were me"; "The fellow that plays the kazoo"; "Knock at the window tonight love";  "The girl in the candy store"; "When the bugle calls to arms; or A red, red rose"; "Little Nelly with her curly head of hair".  His agent was then H. J. Didcott and his contact address was Star Music Hall, Liverpool.

By 6 June 1885, The Era: As above

13 June 1885, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will Mitcham at the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool

20 June 1885, The Era: Charles and Maude Ross, Day's Concert Hall, Birmingham

11 July 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham returned to the Birmingham Concert Hall where 'his musical melange has proved very attractive'

18 July 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham to appear at the Lyceum Theatre, Blackburn from following week.

15 August 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham 'minstrel'

5 September 1885, The Preston Guardian: New Public Hall, Preston ad: 'The Great Will Mitcham in his new Musical and Vocal Entertainment, first appearance since his successful American tour'

26 September 1885, The EraWM's American tour had affected his image!: 'the Great Anglo-American Vocal and Musical Comique'

3 October 1885, The Era: Ad included Will Mitcham 'in his musical and mimical melange' at The Albion Music Hall, Bury

24 October 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham in rehearsal call for Star Music Hall, Manchester

30 October 1885, The Hull Packet and East Riding Times: "Maud and Charley Ross are old favourites at the Alhambra, and their present visit this week will be welcomed by all who attend this place of amusement.  Their singing is very pleasing, whilst their dancing brings forth deafening applause, and their performances are enthusiastically redemanded."

5 December 1885, The Era: review: Will Mitcham at the South London Palace not only sang in military uniform but gave a display of his skill as a bugler.

19 December 1885, The Era: Will Mitcham advertised for an engagement over Christmas presumably because of the 'misarrangement' he mentions.

24 December 1885, Birmingham Daily Post: Gulliver's Travels Pantomime at the prince of Wales Theatre, Broad, Street, B'ham, included Mr Charles Ross and Miss Maude Ross

1886 - 1890

1886

2 January 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham 'as an Italian piper, calls back the doings of "the great Dunbar".' Show review of The Canterbury, London

9 January 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham included in an ad for the coming show at the Canterbury Theatre of Varieties

13 February 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham in rehearsal call for Collins's Music Hall, Islington Green

3 - 10 April 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham letter awaits

24 April 1886, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham, 'transatlantic comedian' at The Royal, Holborn

1 May 1886, The Era: Ad for 'Mr Will Mitcham, the Great Vocal and Musical Anglo-American Comique, Gigantic Success, Royal 8.15'  H J Didcott CMHAA was declared his sole agent.

1 May 1886, The Sporting Times: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross, at The Royal, Holborn

8 May 1886, The Era: 'Married by special licence at Christ Church, Westminster Bridge Road, Sunday May 2d, William Mitchelson, professionally known as Will Mitcham to Miss Harriet Sarah Ann Gaut, professionally known as Miss Maud Ross (of Maud and Charlie Ross)'  Because of her surname's misprint, she wrote in to add the correction 'HSA Gant, daughter of W Gant, late of Holmes and Gant' in the following week's newspaper (15 May), signing it Maude Ross (Mrs W. Mitcham).

? 30 June 1886, Poster For James Deacon's Benefit at North London Palace of Varieties Music Hall, including Maude Ross and Charles Ross

10 July 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham topped the bill at Frame's Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow where his vocal and instrumental contributions 'meet with deserved favour'.

17 - 31 July 1886, The Era: Letter/s awaited Will Mitcham in London while he was appearing at the Gaiety Theatre, Warrington.

28 August 1886, The Era: New Cross Public Hall singing competition where Maude Ross achieved first place with 54 votes, and won £5, complimented for 'her fine soprano voice'.  Tom Morton also performed.

18 September 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham at Philharmonic, Cardiff 'in a well-arranged musical entertainment, hits the tastes of his patrons' while Maud and Charlie Ross 'clever sketch delineators, win much applause'.

25 September 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maud and Charlie Ross appeared at Philharmonic, Cardiff

8 October 1886, Liverpool Mercury: Will Mitcham at the Grand Theatre, Liverpool

9 October 1886, The Era: notice re Charles Ross of Maude and Charles Ross,  'Didcott's charming legacies' that he had been secured for 3 years by Mr G Edwardes of the Gaiety Theatre

12 October 1886, Liverpool Mercury: Miss Maud Ross and Master Charley Ross at the New Star Music Hall whose 'variety programme is one of the most pleasing features of the evening'. Will Mitcham at the Grand Theatre

13 November 1886, The Era: advance notice of a performance on the 16 November: Mr W Morton's benefit at the New Cross Hall, SE, where 'Kenilworth, or the Trials of Amy Robsart' was to be performed with a musical interlude to which Miss Maude Ross and Master Tom Morton were to contribute. (She sang Clay's She wandered down the mountainside'.) A seance followed.  The ensuing review of that evening stressed Maude Ross as a recent first prize winner in a competition organised by Mr Morton. 

6 December 1886, Poster from Middlesex Music Hall, Holborn included Maud and Charlie Ross

11 December 1886, The Era: Will Mitcham, 'capital vocalist' in show review of Gaiety Music Hall Wolverhampton

1887

1 January 1887, The Era:  Didcott advertised that Mr Will Mitcham was a great success at the Clarence Theatre, Dover, and that he appeared at the Standard and Palace, Peckham on Boxing night. Note: it was stated that Miss Maude Ross was 'Resting'.

19 February 1887, The Era: Alhambra Palace, Belfast.  According to the notice, Will Mitcham had been very successful in the Star Music Hall Dublin and was thanking D. Lowrey of the Star for allowing him to appear at the Children's Fancy Ball in aid of St Michael's Hospital, Kingstown , 'being Specially Engaged by the Committee and being complimented all round for his artistic and refined entertainment'.  Interestingly it was also announced that he had bought the rights to the song 'Love, wilt thou be my own' from  Jake Eduard, by H. Starr, and also 'Love in a cottage' by Duffy, music by Jonghmans, for Maud Ross.

7 May 1887, The Era: Ad showing that Will and Maud have combined: 'Mr. Will Mitcham, the Great Vocal and Musical Speciality Artist; also Miss Maud Ross (late of Maud and Charlie Ross) the Refined Serio, Tyrolean Vocalist, Guitar Soloist, and American Song and Dance Artist.  Gigantic success at Gaiety, Newcastle. Monday next, Grand, Liverpool.  Address as above; or, at H.J. Didcott.'

14 and 21 May 1887, The Era: A week later, the ad becomes even more informative: 'Two Distinct Speciality Turns.  Mr. Will Mitcham, the Great Anglo-American Vocal and Musical Comique, also Miss Maude Ross (late of Maude and Charlie Ross) the Refined Serio, Ballad and Tyrolean Vocalist, Guitar Soloist, and American Song and Dance Artist. Great success, Grand, Liverpool, every evening. London, Whit Monday.  Address as above; or, at H.J. Didcott.'

28 May 1887, The Era:   Mr. Will Mitcham and Miss Maude Ross were advertised by Didcott as performing at belmont's varietiues every evening and 'all the Principal Halls to follow'

4 June 1887, The Era: 'Two distinct speciality turns': ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Belmont's Varieties and Sebright Hackney Road every evening.  Maud was singled out.

11, 18, 25 June 1887, The Era:  'Two distinct speciality turns': ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Washington Palace Battersea.

2, 9 July 1887, The Era: 'Two distinct speciality turns': ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Washington Palace Battersea.  Address: 22 Paris St, Lambeth

23 July 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Royal Clarence Theatre, Dover.

29 July 1887, Dover Express quoted in ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross dated 6 August.  It was said that she was 'a charming little lady, whose abilities are far above the average, both as a vocalist, guitarist, and dancer. She has been enthusiastically applauded by the large audience who have attended during the week.'

13 August 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Royal Aquarium, Great Yarmouth the following week.

20 August 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Connaught Varieties, Norwich the following week.

3 September 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Connaught Varieties, Norwich for another three weeks 'with benefit'.

10 September 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Vento's, Portsmouth the following week.

Although their ad sang their praises and also emphasised Maud's American song and dance expertise, they were not fully booked up as their ads of September showed.  However, by October, they were working again, at Criterion varieties, Sheerness.

22 October  1887, The Era: The usual ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross said they had been appearing at the Gaiety music hall in Hanley and that they were about to commence an engagement at the Victoria Theatre, Bolton.

22 October  1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Alexandra, Wigan, the following week.

5 November 1887, The Era: Rehearsal notice for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross to appear at the Grand Circus of Varieties, Rochdale.

12 November 1887, The Era: Rehearsal notice for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross to appear at the Theatre Royal of Varieties, Grimsby.

26 November 1887, The Era: The usual ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross said they had been appearing at the Palace in Nottingham and that they were about to commence an engagement at the Folly, Manchester.

3 December 1887, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross

26 December 1887 onwards, The Morning Post: Charles Ross appeared in the Gaiety Theatre in Frankenstein

31 December 1887, The EraMaude Ross in the company at the Washington, Battersea.  Will Mitcham's name appeared last in the list.

31 December 1887, The Standard: Charles Ross appeared as usual in the Gaiety Theatre in Frankenstein

1888

21 January 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the  Royal Standard Music Hall, Pimlico

28 January 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing  at the  Standard (Will also at Gatti's).  The ad is significant in its praise of Maud, citing The Era's review:  "That there is room for all styles in the hearts of the Standard patrons is shown by the popularity of Miss Maud Ross, a serio and dancer of delicacy and refinement. Miss Ross's style is delicate and elegant, and her dancing in hessians is of the most finished sort. She was rapturously recalled to the stage after her third turn. A yodel song and a ballad 'Pretty Bird' were her vocal selections." Will Mitcham also received praise: " his playing on different instruments is clever, and his style genial and humorous.... he recites capitally with musical accompaniment, and, dressed as a pifferaro, playing on the flageolet, imitates a Milanese piper, gives an imitation of different dialects, and also manipulates the bugle in many ingenious ways, attired in picturesque military Highland garb." Address: 184 Lambeth Road, SE.

3 February 1888, The Morning Post: Charles Ross appeared as usual in the Gaiety Theatre in Frankenstein

4 February 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Paul's Varieties, Leicester.

11 February1888: 'at liberty'

18 February 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Museum, Birmingham.

3 March 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Museum, Birmingham and to go on to Star, Bradford.

10 March 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Oxford Palace, Middlesbrough.

7 April 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who had been appearing at the Gaiety, Halifax.

14 April 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham 'the great Vocal and Musical Comique' and Maude Ross 'the refined lady entertainer' could be contacted at the Scotia, Glasgow the following week  (sole agents: F. Higham and co)

23, 30 April and 3 May 1888, Glasgow Herald: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Scotia Music Hall.

12 May 1888, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maude Ross's agent advertised their 'gigantic success' at Haymarket, Liverpool where they had been retained for another week

19 May 1888, The Era: ad re Will Mitcham and Maude Ross's following week's appearance - a 'special engagement' - at the Summer Gardens, Rhyl

26 May 1888, The Era: ad re Will Mitcham and Maude Ross's following week's appearance at the Prince of Wales Theatre, Birkenhead

2 June 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maude Ross who had been appearing at the Prince of Wales Theatre, Birkenhead where Will Mitcham topped the bill, commended in the review as a 'clever Anglo American artist and musical comedian'.

6 June 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maude Ross who had been appearing at the Town Hall, Welshpool

30 June 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maude Ross who had been appearing at the Town Hall, Welshpool and would be 'at liberty' in 2 weeks

7 July 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maude Ross who would be appearing at the Old City Concert Hall, Coventry the following week

14 July 1888, The Era: Review of their performances Will Mitcham ' a very efficient artist... inimitable in all he undertakes...His execution of military bugle calls may be characterised by perfection.'  and Maude Ross whose vocalisation was memorable and whose guitar performance was 'highly commendable'.

21 July 1888, The Era Will Mitcham ' and Maude Ross continued their successful run at Old City Concert Hall, Coventry

4 August 1888, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross (one of the ladies providing 'feminine attractions') appearing at Paul's Concert Hall, Leicester.

26 October 1888: Will Mitcham ('30'), wife ('25') and Maud ('3' months) arrive in New York from Liverpool on board the 'City of Rome'

8, 15 December 1888, The Era: "English artists meet with success in America Vide New York Clipper, Nov. 7th 1888.  Mr. Will Mitcham, Miss Maud Ross now on Tour with Nelson's World Combination.  Address, "Clipper" Office, or box 1,075, Streator, Ills."

1889

12 January 1889, The Era: "English artists meet with success in America Vide New York Clipper, Nov. 7th 1888.  Mr. Will Mitcham, Miss Maud Ross now on Tour with Nelson's World Combination.  Address, "Clipper" Office, or box 1,075, Streator, Ills."

27 April 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who had just returned from a successful American tour and were currently appearing at Theatre Royal, Sunderland followed by Oxford Palace of Varieties, Middlesbrough.

30 April 1889, Northern Echo: Review re Will Mitcham ('readily enlists the goodwill of the audience') and Maud Ross (one of the ladies who provided a 'pleasant diversion') who were appearing at Oxford Palace of Varieties, Middlesbrough.

31 August 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who would be appearing at Forester's, Queen's, Washington and had been hired by the 'Barnum of the north' FW Frame for a three months' tour of Scotland with his concert party beginning in Bank Holiday 1890.  Once again F. Higham appears as their agent instead of Didcott.

21 September 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham (appearing at the Cambridge and Peckham's) and Maud Ross (Peckham's), followed by Queen's and Washington.

28 September 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham (appearing at the Queen's and Washington) and Maud Ross (Washington).

12 October 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham (appearing at the Queen's, Poplar and Standard) and Maud Ross (Queen's).

19 October 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham (appearing at the Standard) and Maud Ross (appearing at the Cambridge and Washington), with Queen's the following week.

2 November 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham (appearing at Queen's, Poplar) and Maud Ross (appearing at Queen's, Poplar).

9 November 1889, Playbill: Charles Ross 'Dainty Champion' from the Gaiety appeared at Gatti’s Villiers Street

9 November 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Queen's, Poplar; Charles Ross still with Hugh J Didcott as agent was making an impression. London Pavilion, Royal, South London, and Gatti's (Arches).  The Daily Despatch was quoted as commenting that Mr Charles Ross was the best item on the bill in the South London Palace Company.

16 November 1889, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross, both 'resting'

21 December 1889, The Era: Rehearsal ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at St James's Hall, Plymouth.

1890

15 February 1890, The Era: Positive review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Palace, Nottingham.

8 March 1890, The Era: Review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Alhambra, Brighton.

24 May 1890, The Era: Review of 17 May is quoted for Maud Ross, appearing at Belmont's, who is remembered appearing with her brother and now, though wooed and married, 'still sings ballads prettily' and her dancing, too, in top boots is a saltatory exercise that brings the house down'.

21 June 1890, The Era: Rehearsal ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Queen's, Poplar.

2, 16 August; 6, 13, 20, 27 September; 4, 11, 25 October 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross were on a three months' tour of Scotland with his concert party, contactable at 22 Sandyford Street, Glasgow, or through Oliver and Holmes.  on the 25 October, the tour was over with re-engagement promised for 3 more seasons.  The contact was still through their agents Oliver and Holmes, but the address: 18 Greek Street, Liverpool.

25 October 1890, The Era: Review of Frame's Concert, Govanhill: 'William Meecham showed considerable skill in his cornet solos'; Maud Ross also complimented.  The review gives reasons for the show's success as there were no encores or 'waits' and so each performer took the stage as the former artist left, thereby giving two solid hours of performance appreciated by the standing-room-only audience.

8 November 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Paddington Palace, Liverpool.

15 November 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Alexandra, Wigan.

22 November 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Lyceum Theatre, Blackburn.

29 November 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Rudge's Palace of Varieties, Ashton-under-Lyne.

6 December 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Albion Theatre, Bury.

13 December 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Victoria Hall, Morley.

20 December 1890, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at Oxford Music Hall, Middlesbrough

27 December 1890, The Era: Rehearsal for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross for Thornton's Theatre of Varieties, South Shields.

1891 - 1895

1891

3 January 1891, The Era: Rehearsal for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross for The Royal, Sunderland.

17 January 1891, The Era: Rehearsal for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross for New Alhambra, West Hartlepool.

24 January 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross and 'phizorama' for Britannia Music Hall, Glasgow.

31 January 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross and 'phizorama' described as 'a grand pictorial musical entertainment'  it was stressed that all could be engaged separately and there were vacant dates...  Britannia Music hall to be played the following week.

7 February 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross and 'phizorama' at the Palace, Nottingham.

14 February 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross to appear at the Alhambra, Brighton.

21 February 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Alhambra, Brighton.

28 February 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Middlesex.

7 March 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Middlesex.

14 March 1891, The Era: Ad for Charles Ross 'Dainty Champion' from the Gaiety appearing at South London.

21 March 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross 'resting' before concert tour start on 30 March.

28 March 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham appears to have gone on the Scottish tour without Maud Ross who still 'resting' 86 Upper Kennington Lane.  The first stop of his itinerary was Linlithgow.

4, 11 April 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham on the Scottish tour without Maud Ross who still 'resting'

17 April 1891, Aberdeen Weekly Journal:  Ad re Frame's tour performance at Stonehaven on the 18th.  Will Mitcham to play Milanese Serenade 'Open your window, Melinda'; Musical Military Scene and Cornet Solo; Maud Ross was supposed to perform Serenade with guitar accompaniment; song and dance 'Yes I love him so'; Excelsior Top Boot Dance.  However, in the era she is shown to be still resting.

25 April 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham on the Scottish tour without Maud Ross who still 'resting'

9 May 1891, The Era: Princess's Palace, Leeds.  Rehearsal ad: Artists from 11 May would be including Will Mitcham and Maud Ross.

16 May 1891, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Metropole, Birkenhead.

23 May 1891, The Era: Review of Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Metropole, Birkenhead, describes Maud as' a charming artist'.

30 May 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Parthenon, Liverpool.  Contact 18 Greek Street

6 June 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Westminster.

23 June1891, The Era: Review of Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Empire, Cardiff, complimented Maud on her singing and dancing that raised encores and Will particularly on his cornet playing.

25 June 1891, Western Mail: Empire, Cardiff: announcement of evening's show gave second billing to Will and Maud.

27 June 1891, The Era: Empire, Cardiff: "Miss Maud Ross is an excellent artist; and Will Mitcham, instrumentalist, is popular"

27 June 1891, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Swansea Pavilion.

11 July 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Gaiety, Leicester.

25 July 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Gaiety, Leicester.  Also announced they were resting before the Scottish concert tour.

1 August 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour.

15, 22 August 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour.

15 August 1891, The Era: Ad for Charles Ross appearing at London Pavilion.

4 & 11 Sept 1891, The Era: New Empire Palace of Varieties, Leicester: WM: 'variety entertainer / instrumentalist'

19 September 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour.

3 October 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour, next leg in Bathgate.

10 October 1891, The Era: Miss Maud Venner as Mademoiselle Anastasia in The Acrobat at Theatre Royal, Birmingham

10 October 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour, next leg in Ayr. 'Good song required. price no object.' Ad for Charles Ross appearing at Empire, Cardiff.

17 October 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on the Scottish concert tour, next leg in Port Glasgow

31 October 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who had finished the Scottish concert tour, and were to appear at the Alhambra Pavilion, Aberdeen.

7 November 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who were to appear at Archer's Concert hall, Govan, followed the next day by performances at Lithgow's Concert, Larkhall.  39 Dunmore Street, Glasgow.

28 November 1891, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Grand Circus of Varieties, Rochdale.

5 December 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who had just appeared at Gaiety Theatre, Oldham and were due to appear at Victoria Hall, Bolton.

12 December 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross due to appear at Alexandra, Wigan.

19 December 1891, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross due to appear at People's Manchester.  Clearly, writers had responded to their notice for good comic songs as they thanks senders for their songs.  Review of the Manchester performance showed they were still delivering well-appreciated competent performances.

19 December 1891, The Era: Maud Venner 'in every way acceptable as Hera' in review of production at Grand Theatre Derby.

26 December 1891, The Era: Review of the Manchester performance showed Will Mitcham and Maud Ross were still delivering well-appreciated competent performances.

26 December 1891, The Era: Rudge's Varieties, Ashton-under-Lyne: 'William Mitcham, instrumentalist, is very clever'

1892

2 January 1892, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Scotia Variety Theatre, Glasgow.

9 January 1892, The Era: Sound review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Scotia Variety Theatre, Glasgow.

16, 23 January 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Olympia Theatre, Belfast.  Reviewed on 30 January.

30 January 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Parthenon, Liverpool

6 February 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Parthenon, Liverpool. Ad for Charles Ross appearing at Metropolitan Music Hall.

13 February 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Empire, Newport.

23 February 1892, Western Mail: Positive review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Empire, Newport.

27 February 1892, The Era: Positive review for Will Mitcham 'ever a favourite here' and Maud Ross at Empire, Cardiff.

27 February 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross performing next at Star Music Hall, Bradford.

5 March 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross performing at Star Music Hall, Bradford, next at Oddfellows' Hall Halifax.

12 March 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross performing at Oddfellows' Hall Halifax, next at the Circus, Wakefield.

19 March 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross performing at Grand Theatre, Stockton on Tees.

19 March 1892, The Era:  Maud Venner, one of cast at Her Majesty's, Carlisle

26 March 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross next on their fourth Scottish concert tour.

2, 9, 16 April 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on their fourth Scottish concert tour.

16 April 1892, Aberdeen Weekly Journal: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on their fourth Scottish concert tour included details of performances that evening: Will Mitcham to play Musical Military Scene (Cornet Solo à la Levy) and bassoon solo 'Rock'd in the cradle of the deep'; Maud Ross was to perform song and dance 'TA RA RA BOOM DE AY'; Excelsior Top Boot Dance; song 'He was whistling as happy as a bird'. 

23 April 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross on their fourth Scottish concert tour.

14 May 1892, The Era: Review for Will Mitcham and 'charming' Maud Ross at the Gaiety Palace, Sheffield.

14 May 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross - 'the big little artist'.

21 May 1892, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Gaiety Palace, Sheffield, then on to Gaiety Wolverhampton.

28 May 1892, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross for Westminster Smith Street, Liverpool

25 June 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Crystal Palace, Birmingham.  Greek street address for contact.

2 July 1892, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Days Concert Hall, Birmingham in which Will is described in the review as a 'cosmopolitan character vocalist'.

4 July 1892, The Dart - Birmingham Pictorial: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Day's Crystal Palace, Birmingham

9 July 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross who are to appear at Sydenham Palace Coventry.

16 July 1892, The Era: Review for Will Mitcham ('a treat') and Maud Ross ('sings and dances charmingly') who are to appear at Sydenham Palace Coventry.

23, 30 July 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Gaiety Leicester.

6 August 1892, The Era: Reviews for Will Mitcham (applauded every night for his able performance on a variety of instruments) and Maud Ross ('clever' singer and dancer) at Poplar Music Hall Ilkeston.  Next engagement Rudge's Ashton > People's Manchester > Empire Hanley > Star Bradford > Princess's Leeds.

13 August 1892, The Era: Reviews for Will Mitcham (as a humourist is a great favourite) and Maud Ross ('popular') at Rudge's Ashton.

27 August 1892, The Era: Review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at People's Manchester. Also ad re pair thanking Oliver and Holmes for offer of America tour and Col Dyke for 9 month tour.

17 September 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Empire Hanley.

17 September 1892, The Era: Star Music Hall, Bradford: 'Miss Maud Ross, vocalist, dancer, and instrumentalist; Mr Will Mitcham, instrumentalist'

24 September 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross just at Prince's Preston, then on to appear at Town Hall Rochdale.

1 October 1892, The Era:  Rehearsal call. From 3 October, Will and Maud to appear at the Princess's Palace, Leeds

8 October 1892, The Era:  Article re Maud Ross who received 'three splendid rubies' from S S Baldwin, the Butterfly company 'as a mark of esteem' at Rochdale Town Hall the previous Saturday.

15 October 1892, The Era:  Will Mitcham and Maud Ross  were resting but announced a brief season at South London 24/29 October.  Contact address 238 Kennington Road, SE.

12 November 1892, The Era:  Will Mitcham and Maud Ross were due to leave on a short provincial tour (first stop Royal York Southampton).

26 November 1892, The Era:  Will Mitcham and Maud Ross announced their contact address as Haymarket Liverpool.

10 December 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross to appear at People's Palace, Portsmouth.  Still advertising for good songs!

17, 24 December 1892, The Era: Review mentioned Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing / re-engaged at People's Palace, Portsmouth.

31 December 1892, The Era: Ad for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross appearing at the Empire, Cardiff > Empire, Swansea.

1893

24 October 1893, The New York Times: Maud Venner as Stephano in The Merchant of Venice at Hermann's

16 December 1893, Western MailCharlie Ross was billed to appear at the Empire, Cardiff, described as 'The Comedian from the Gaiety Theatre, London' with the catchphrase, 'She do, I know she do'.  This was probably his last billing, and, in the light of his illness and death, it's unlikely that he appeared as announced.

28 December 1893, Western Mail: 'DEATH OF A COMEDIAN AT CARDIFF  William George Gant, well-known as Charlie Ross, the comedian of the variety stage, died from decline at 25 Patridge-road, Cardiff, on Christmas Day.  The deceased, who was only twenty-four years of age, had already gained brilliant success in his profession, and was in his private life cheerful and bright, being much beloved by all that knew him.  He started professional life with his father, Mr Gant, in Mr Hamilton's company at the Amphitheatre, Holborn, while yet almost a boy, and has since been through all the music-halls of London.  The deceased at one time had a three years' engagement at the Gaiety Theatre, London, which was attended with great success.  A curious coincidence of how the deceased came to adopt the name of "Charlie Ross" is reported.  When a little boy he went with his mother on a visit to Liverpool to see his father, who was engaged at the Star Theatre there.  While in Liverpool they were introduced to some of Sam Hague's Minstrels, and the remark was passed that the little boy was very like Charlie Ross of America Mr Gant, hearing this, thought that if ever his son went on the boards, he would give him the name of "Charlie Ross" and that name was borne by the deceased all through his professional career.  While staying in a certain town a short time after his start two detectives got into conversation with the deceased.  They had noticed that the lad was remarkably like a "Charlie Ross" who had been kidnapped from his home, and, producing a photo, the features of the lost lad and the little artiste were almost identical.  Thinking that they had got hold of the right lad, they questioned him, but, after hearing the boy's answers, they found they were on the wrong track..  Some years ago, when the deceased was playing the title role in the Yellow Dwarf in Her Majesty's Theatre, London,  Charlie was called up to the Prince of Wales's box, and was congratulated by the Prince and Princess and their two sons of his acting..  He had always been a devoted son, and never travelled without his mother., who has now taken the name of Ross.  His sister, Maude Ross, was engaged for the Newport Empire this week, but, owing to the sad occurrence, has not appeared.  The deceased elder brother is also at Cardiff at present.  He has been unable to perform for about eight weeks owing to his illness, and this was the cause of his non-appearance at the Cardiff Empire the week before last.  The funeral will take place from Mr Rees' house, on Friday at one o'clock.'

30 December 1893, The Era: 'Our music hall readers will hear with regret of the death of Mr Charles Ross, the news of whose death at Cardiff became current on Boxing Night at the London Pavilion, where the deceased comedian was engaged as one of the Christmas company.  He succumbed on Christmas Day, at the age of twenty-four, after four weeks' serious illness, to a pulmonary complaint.

Mr CHARLES ROSS, who was left an orphan at an early age, appeared as a child with his sister Maud, under the auspices of Mr Didcott, who procured them a run of engagements at the music halls, where they became exceedingly popular.  Soon after Miss Maud Ross married Mr Will Mitcham, Charles went to the Gaiety to fulfil a three years' engagement with Mr George Edwardes.

Mr ROSS, whose real name was William George Gant, made his first appearance beneath the beams of the "sacred lamp" in a small part in Monte Cristo.  His responsibilities increased with his experience, and though his step-dancing, of which he was a most graceful exponent, was invariably utilised, he was given in later Gaiety productions more scope for his acting talent.  He appeared at one of Miss Farren's benefits as one of the urchins in Squeer's school, in a scene from Nicholas Nickleby, the lamented Fred, Leslie being the Nicholas, and also went on tour in Gaiety burlesque.  When quite a lad Master Charlie Ross, as he was then called, played the part of Gambogee, in the unfortunate production, on Dec. 30th, 1882, at Her Majesty's, of Robert Reece and Alfred Thompson's extravaganza, The Yellow Dwarf.

His father was a well known entertainer, who was at one time in partnership with Mr Tom Holmes.  The deceased comedian - who, at the time of his death was staying at the house of his friend, Mr F. Rees, in Cardiff - was buried yesterday.  Charles Ross was an excellent son, and was the main support of a widowed mother.  His indifferent health has prevented him working for more than four months during the present year.'

1894

6  January 1894, The Era: 'The funeral of William George Gant, better known in the profession as "Charlie Ross" the comedian and dancer, who died of consumption...... took place on Friday 29th ult.  The body was enclosed in a polished coffin with massive brass furniture, and the plate bore the simple inscription "William George Gant, died December 25, 1893, aged twenty-four years."  Among the mourners present were Mrs Gant, his mother; Mr G.W. Gant, his brother; Mr and Mrs Mitcham, sister and brother in law; and Mr and Mrs Rees, Mr and Mrs Captain Williams, Mr and Mrs Carrick, and Mr C Bryant, Portsmouth.  Amongst those present, in addition to the principal mourners, were Messrs J. E. Lewis, G. Harrington (manager of the Alhambra, Cardiff), T. James, Ambrose Jenkins, John Powell, Alec Pringle, Fred Searl, George Mitchell, M. Burton, Charlie Johns, and Mr and Mrs O'Donnell.'

12 January 1894, Manchester Times: 'Mr. W. G. Grant, known in the profession as "Charlie Ross", a young comedian of bright promise, once a member of the Gaiety Company, died at the house of his friend, Mr F. Reece, in Cardiff, on Christmas Day.  He was only in his 24th year, a life too short both for friendship and for fame.'

30 January 1894, Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Review of show at The People's Palace, Bristol: 'Will Mitcham in some Clever Vocal and musical speciality business, provides a capital turn.' 'Miss Maud Ross (a smart Tyrolean vocalist and top-boot dancer)'

6 February 1894, Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Show review at People's Palace: Will: 'a clever character vocalist'

7 and 8 and 9 February 1894, Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Will and Maud still at Bristol's people's Palace

11 May 1894, The New York Times: Daniel Frohman's Lyceum Theatre Stock Company: Maud Venner to be added to the company during the next season.

12 May 1894, The Era: Will Mitcham, 'clever Maud Ross' at the Scotia, Glasgow

21 and 22 and 25 and 31 May 1894, The Belfast News-letter: Will and Maud billing at the Alhambra, Belfast

1 June 1894, The Belfast News-letter: Will and Maud billing at the Alhambra, Belfast

14 July 1894, The Era: 'Will Mitcham, comedian,' 'Maud Ross, guitarist and song and dance artist' at the Victoria Theatre of Varieties, Bolton

11 August 1894, The Era: 'Will Mitcham, vocalist and comedian,' at the New Palace of Varieties, Leicester

25 August 1894, The Era: 'Will Mitcham, vocalist and instrumentalist,' 'Maud Ross, serio and dancer' at the Royal Standard Music Hall

18 November 1894, The New York Times: Maude Venner as one of the 'amusing types of the French character'  in Daniel Frohman's company of players who were to perform A Woman's Silence (based on the original by Victorien Sardou) at the Lyceum.

21 November 1894, The New York Times: Maude Venner listed in the cast as Baroness von Stannitz in A Woman's Silence  at the Lyceum.

1 December 1894, The Era: Victoria Music Hall, Morley: show review: 'Mr Will Mitcham is accorded an enthusiatistic receptions, his instrumental selections being especially enjoyable' ''Maud Ross, an excellent dancer'

1 December 1894, The Era: Parthenon Music Hall, Liverpool billing for Will and Maud 'ballad vocalist'

3 December 1894: Will and Maud at the rehearsal, Princess's Palace, Leeds.

29 December 1894, The Era: 'IN MEMORIAM, -In ever loving memory of Charlie Ross (W.G. Gant), who departed this died Dec. 25th 1893. Gone, but not forgotten by his loving relatives.'

1895

5 January 1895, The Era: Parthenon Music Hall, Liverpool billing for Will and Maud now 'a burlesque actress and dancer'

19 January 1895, The Era: The Empire, Cardiff: 'the ever-popular Will Mitcham' ; Maud 'effective ballad music and top boot efforts'

24 and 26 January 1895, The Western Mail: Will and Maud shared billing with 'Raffin's Learned Pig, Jockey Monkeys and Galloping Donkey'! at The Empire, Newport

9 February 1895, The Era: St James's Hall, Plymouth billing for Will and Miss Maude Ross

11 and 13 and 15 and 18 and 19 February 1895, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Billing for Will and Maud at The People's Palace, Bristol

23 February 1895, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post:  Maud and Will 'a good turn as a Milanese piper etc' at The People's Palace, Bristol

2 March 1895, The Era: People's Palace, Newcastle, billing Maud and Will

9 March 1895, The Era: People's Palace, Newcastle, review mentioned 'Miss Maud Ross; Will Mitcham, comedian'

16 March 1895, The Era: People's Palace, Sunderland, review mentioned Miss Maud Ross; Will Mitcham, 'a great favourite, scores well with his versatility'.  Also, Will contributed 10s to Ernest Sheldon's testimonial benefit in Newcastle.

6 April 1895, The Era: People's Palace, Aberdeen, billing Maud and Will

16 April 1895, The Dundee Courier and Argus: Review commented on the small but enthusiastic audience; Will's skill on bassoon, cornet, Tyrolean pipe, bugle and other instruments; Maud's performance was 'very clever'

20 April 1895, The Era: People's Palace, Dundee, billing Maud and Will, where her serio-comedy is popular.

4 May 1895, The Era: Rehearsal call, Alhambra Belfast for Maud and Will

6 - 11 May 1895, The Belfast News-letter: Alhambra Belfast, billing for Maud and Will

11 May 1895,The Era: Alhambra Belfast, billing for Maud and Will

13 - 18 May 1895, The Belfast News-letter: Alhambra Belfast, billing for Maud and Will

8 June 1895,The Era: People's Concert Hall, Manchester, review: Will's versatility and Maud proficiency in song and dance get a brief mention; a week later Will is still versatile; Maud's act as a comedienne is also added.

15 June 1895,The Era: Call to rehearsal from 17 June for Maud and Will at Princess's Palace, Leeds

1 July 1895, Liverpool Mercury:  ad for show at The Palace, New Brighton includes Maud and Will

6 - 13 July 1895,The Era: Ad and Review of show at The Palace, New Brighton includes Maud and Will who are supposedly 'in high favour'

27 July 1895,The Era: Parthenon, Liverpool, billing includes Maud and Will

3 August 1895,The Era: Victoria Theatre of Varieties, Bolton, billing includes Maud 'serio-comedienne and dancer' and Will 'musical and speciality artist'

17 August 1895,The Era: New Empire Palace of Varieties, Leicester: Maud 'vocalist and top-boot dancer' and Will 'musical and speciality entertainer'

14 September 1895, The Era: Barnard's Palace of Varieties, Chatham, review: Maud 'proves very deserving' and Will 'comes in for a good share of applause'.  Call to rehearsal for Maud and Will for following week at Phoenix Music Hall, Dover

28 September 1895, The Era: Royal Standard, Victoria; Maud and Will on support billing for Grand International Wrestling Tournament

2 November 1895, The Era: Grand Circus of varieties, Rochdale: call to rehearsal for Maud and Will

30 November 1895, The Era: Empire Palace, Hanley: Will the  'instrumentalist'.  also a news item reported that Maud and Will had been booked for the Stoll, Livermore, and Moss and Thornton tours for 1896

14 December 1895, The Era: rehearsal call  for 16th for Will and Maud  at Princess's Palace, Leeds

28 December 1895, The Era: 'ROSS, - In loving memory of W.G.Gant (Charlie Ross) comedian, who died at Cardiff Dec. 25th 1893. Gone, but never forgotten by his loving relatives. R.I.P.'

1896 - 1900

1896

4 January 1896, The Era: Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead: bill included Will 'proves himself a vocal and instrumental entertainer of ability' and Maud, serio and terpsichorean artiste, gives an agreeable turn'

25 January 1896, The Era: Empire, Swansea bill included Will and Maud,

8 February 1896, The Era: St James's Hall, Plymouth: bill included Will and Maud,

15 February 1896, The Era: St James's Hall, Plymouth: bill included Will and Maud,

19 February 1896, The Era: St James's Hall, Plymouth: bill included Will whose 'cornet and pipe solos are distinctly good' and Maud,

19 February 1896, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: People's Palace, Bristol bill included Will and Maud,

22 February 1896, The Era: People's Palace, Bristol bill included Will and Maud,

24 - 26 February 1896, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: People's Palace, Bristol bill included Will and Maud, contributed items that were greatly appreciated'

29 February 1896, The Era: Palace, Bristol bill included Will and Maud 'smart step dancer'

17 , 19 March 1896, Northern Echo: Grand Variety and Opera House, Stockton bill included Will and Maud

28 March 1896, The Era: New Grand Varieties, Bolton, bill  included Will 'character impersonator' and Maud

18 April 1896, The Era: In an ad for work, WM and Maud's address is given as Post Office, Prudhoe on Tyne

2 May 1896, The Era: Empire Variety Theatre, Newcastle bill included Will and Maud

13 June 1896, The Era: People's Palace, Bradford: bill  included Will and Maud; Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead: Will 'on a welcome return visit' and Maud 'a favourite'

20 June 1896, The Era: Princess's Palace, Leeds call to rehearsal for Will and Maud

27 June 1896, The Era: Princess's Palace, Leeds included Will and Maud

11 July 1896, The Era: Empire Palace, Sheffield review: Will, 'a clever and original musical entertainer' and Maud, the agile dancer, from the Gaiety theatre'

15 July 1896, Liverpool Mercury: Palace, New Brighton: included Will

18 July 1896, The Era: Palace, New Brighton: included Will as one of the newcomers

25 July 1896, The Era: Palace, New Brighton: included Will and Maud; People's Palace, St Helens: call to rehearsal included Will and Maud

1 August 1896, The Era: People's Palace, St Helens, "Another newcomer is Mr Will Mitcham as instrumentalist of merit, who is much applauded"

8 August 1896, The Era: New Empire Palace of Varieties  included Will and Maud in their usual performances

15 August 1896, The Era: Harte's Grand Palace, Ashton-under-Lyne: call to rehearsal included Will and Maud

22 August 1896, The Era: Harte's Grand Palace, Ashton-under-Lyne:  included Will and Maud who also played her guitar here

12 September 1896, The Era: Grand Theatre, Boscombe: included Will and Maud

3 October 1896, The Era: The Palace, Nottingham: Will 'excellent musical entertainment' and Maud 'pleasing serio contributions'

10 October 1896, The Era: In a letter to the Editor referring to the disaster by fire, in which performers lost stage effects, props and music, at Aberdeen Palace, Ernest Sheldon said the show would continue (Will and Maud included in the company) at the Alhambra on 12 October.  Elsewhere the review of the show stated Will, character vocalist and musician, is a capital entertainer' while Maud, a charming artist, displayed commendable ability, a smart top-boot dance fairly bringing down the house'

17 - 24 October 1896, The Era: Alhambra Variety Theatre, Aberdeen included Will and Maud

31 October 1896, The Era: People's Palace, Dundee: in the review, Will and Maud are ever popular for singing / dancing / 'Milanese minstrelsy'

14 November 1896, The Era: Will and Maud's ad includes reference to her being the 'Champion Top-Boot dancer of the World'

21 November 1896, The Era: Empire Palace, Hanley: Will and Maud 'a graceful dancer' included in the company

6 December 1896, The New York Times: Maude Venner in Edward S Willard's The Rogue's Comedy

8 December 1896, The New York Times: Maude Venner as Nina Clarabut in the cast of The Rogue's Comedy (by Henry Arthur Jones) at Waller's

19 December 1896, The Era: National Palace of Varieties, North-End, Croydon, call to rehearsal for Will and Maud

26 December 1896, The Era: 'ROSS, - In loving memory of Charlie Ross, comedian, who died at Cardiff Dec. 25th 1893. Gone, but not forgotten by his loving relatives. R.I.P.'

26 December 1896, The Era: National Palace of Varieties, Croydon, review: 'Maud Ross, dancer; Will Mitcham, versatile entertainer'

1897

19 January 1897, Western Mail: Ad for that evening, Maud and Will at the Empire, Newport.

16 February 1897, The Bristol Times and Mirror: Will Mitcham  and Maud Ross from the People's Palace appeared at J. Wolseley Poole's Benefit at Poole's Myriorama, Bristol.

15 March 1897: Will Mitcham, vocalist and instrumentalist, Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead. (NFA: 178R12.77 Playbill)

15, 23 April 1897, The Owl: Will ('a comedian who has ideas, and will go far') and Maud at the Empire Palace, 'one of the acceptable turns to the entertainment'

3 July 1897, The Era: Will and Maud at the Empire Palace, Glasgow

11 October 1897: Will Mitcham, vocal and musical speciality artiste; Maude Ross, comedienne, guitar soloist and tap boot dancer Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead. (NFA: 178R12.116 Playbill)

6 November 1897, The Era: Will and Maud at the Star Palace of Varieties, Barrow in Furness

18 December 1897, The Era: Will and Maud on rehearsal call at the Palace of Varieties, Dover

25 December 1897, The Era: 'ROSS, - In loving memory of late Charlie Ross who died Dec. 25th 1893. Never to be forgotten by his loving relatives. R.I.P.'

1898

15 September 1898, The Era: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross

30 September 1898, The Birmingham Pictorial and Dart: Will Mitcham ('contributes an excellent turn') and Maud Ross at the Empire Palace of Varieties, Birmingham

23, 30 September 1898, The Owl: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross ('dances with much skill and grace') at the Empire Palace of Varieties, Birmingham

24 December 1898, The Era: 'Maud Ross, serio; Will Mitcham, musical speciality artiste' in review of show at Empire, Leicester

31 December 1898, The Era: 'ROSS, - In loving memory of Charlie Ross who died Dec. 25th 1893. Gone but never forgotten by his loving relatives, Mitcham and Ross. R.I.P.'

1899

21 January 1899, The Era: Alhambra, Brighton review: 'Will Mitcham, vocalist and instrumentalist;' 'Maud Ross, top-boot dancer'

1 April 1899, The Era: Will and Maud at Empire, Leeds

15 April 1899, The Era:  Through an 'error', Will Mitcham and Maud Ross had no work from the 17 April and the 24 April, although they were booked from the 22 April for Moss and Thornton, Livermore, Stoll and Graydon tour.  They gave their contact address as: 10 Langton Road, Smithdown Road, Liverpool.

17 June 1899, The Era: Call to rehearsal for Will and Maud, Empire Palace, South Shields

25 August 1899, The Birmingham Pictorial - Dart: Positive reviews for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at the Empire Palace of Varieties, Birmingham

25 August 1899, The Owl: Will Mitcham at the Empire Palace of Varieties, Birmingham.  Good review for Will Mitcham and Maud Ross ('smart top-boot dance is invariably encored') in that day's The Birmingham Pictorial and Dart

30 September 1899, The Era: Call to rehearsal for Will and Maud, Empire Theatre, Newcastle

1900

6 January 1900, The Era: 'Will Mitcham's efforts as an instrumentalist are warmly re-demanded'  Palace Theatre of Varieties, Croydon,  review

13 January 1900, The Era: Rehearsal notice mentions Will Mitcham and Maud Ross, Empire, New Cross, London

3 and 10 February 1900, The Era: Middlesex Music Hall, Drury Lane: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross

3 February 1900, The Era: Middlesex ad for Mr Will Mitcham, Musical Comedian, and Maud Ross 'the Dainty Little Performer'

17 February 1900, The Era: 'Will Mitcham and Maude Ross leave town on Monday to commence a long tour, opening at the Palace, Plymouth'

24 February 1900, The Era: Will and Maud to appear at the People's Palace, Bristol the following week

1 March 1900, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Will and Maud listed

2 and 3 March 1900, The Era and in The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post:: Will Mitcham, 'vocalist and instrumentalist', Miss Maud Ross, serio and dancer, The People's Palace, Baldwin St, Bristol

5 March 1900, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: Ad for People's Palace, Bristol: 'Will Mitcham, vocal comedian'

6 and 8 March 1900, The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post: 'Will Mitcham, vocal comedian' 'Maud Ross, serio-comedienne and top-boot dancer'

10 March 1900, The Era: Ad that 'Mr. Will Mitcham, Musical Comedian, and Maud Ross the Dainty Little Performer'  to appear at the Empire, Leeds the following week

17 March 1900, The Era: Ad that 'Mr. Will Mitcham, Musical Comedian, and Maud Ross the Dainty Little Performer'  to appear at the Empire, Edinburgh the following week.  Also 'Will Mitcham is a musical comedian of ability' review for performance at the Empire, Leeds

24 March 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for 26 March, and ad for appearance of Will and Maud at the Empire Theatre, Glasgow

31 March 1900, The Era: Will and Maud are mentioned in review of Empire Theatre show, Glasgow, just as part of group who gave 'smart turns'. Rehearsal call for same theatre for 2 April plus their ad for next week

7 April 1900, The Era: Booking and rehearsal announcement (9 April) plus ad that 'Mr. Will Mitcham, Musical Comedian, and Maud Ross the Dainty Little Performer'  to appear, Empire Theatre, Belfast

9 and 14 April 1900, The Belfast News-Letter: Ad that 'Maud Ross Serio Comedienne and Dancer; Will Mitcham, the Musical Comedian' are appearing at The Empire Theatre of Varieties, Belfast

14 April 1900, The Era: rehearsal call for Empire Theatre, Dublin: Will Mitcham, Maud Ross

17 April 1900, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): Ad of Empire Palace Theatre: 'Maud Ross...Will Mitcham Re-engagement owing to the terrific success of The War Pictures'

21 April 1900, The Era: Ad that 'Mr. Will Mitcham, Musical Comedian, and Maud Ross the Dainty Little Performer' to appear at the Empire, Dublin the next week. Review for Empire Palace Theatre, Dublin: 'Will Mitcham, a good Musical Comedian', 'Maud Ross scores as a serio'

24 April 1900, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): Show review 'Mr Will Mitcham and Miss Maud Ross contributed popular turns'

25 April 1900, Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin): Ad for Empire Palace Theatre, Dublin: Mr Will Mitcham, Miss Maud Ross

28 April 1900, The Era: Review: 'Miss Maud Ross is warmly applauded for her singing and dancing' and later after mention of a lady with her cockatoo,  'Will Mitcham is a versatile comedian', Empire, Dublin.  Also rehearsal call for Will and Maud for 30 April at the Empire Theatre, Dublin

2 May 1900, Liverpool Mercury: New Empire Theatre Liverpool bill: Will Mitcham and Maud Ross

5 May 1900, The Era: New Empire Theatre Liverpool Review: 'Mr Will Mitcham, musical comedian'; 'Miss M. Ross, serio'

26 May 1900, The Era: Will and Maud now at the Empire Theatre, Cardiff

2 June 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Empire Theatre Newport, 4 June

7 June 1900, Western Mail, Cardiff: Ad for show including Will and Maud at Empire Theatre Newport

9 June 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Empire Theatre Swansea, 11 June

11 and 15 June 1900, Western Mail, Cardiff: Ad for show including Maud (no mention is Will - is he included in 'etc'?) at Empire Theatre, Swansea

23 June 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Empire Theatre South Shields, 25 June

11 August 1900, The Era: People's Palace, Portsmouth ad: 'Will Mitcham, instrumentalist; and Maud Ross, song and dance artiste'

25 August 1900, The Era: 'Will Mitcham and Maud Ross, Sheffield favourites', at Empire Palace, Sheffield.  Also rehearsal call for  'Will Mitcham and Maud Ross at Empire Theatre, Bradford

1 September 1900, The Era: 'Miss Maud Ross appears here again with her old skill as a dancer in top boots, and we have some acceptable comic vocalism from Messrs T B Fayme and Will Mitcham', Empire Bradford review

15 September 1900, The Era:  Grand Theatre, Bolton review: 'Miss Maud Ross, ballad and Tyrolean vocalist' ; 'Will Mitcham, speciality artist'

29 September 1900, The Era: The Royal, Liverpool, billing: Miss Maud Ross, ballad vocalist and dancer', 'Will Mitcham, speciality artiste'

13 October 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Grand Theatre, Walsall, 15 October

19 October 1900, Birmingham Pictorial - The Dart:  Will and Maud, Empire Palace, Birmingham,

27 October 1900, The Era: Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Empire Palace of Varieties, Birmingham, 2 week engagement

10 November 1900, The Era: Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead review: '...Miss Maud Ross, a clever top boot dancer, and Mr Will Mitcham, instrumentalist, complete the company'

10 November 1900, The Era:  Rehearsal call for Will and Maud, Palace Theatre, Manchester, 12 November

24 November 1900, The Era: Empire Palace Wolverhampton, review shows pair at the bottom of the short bill: 'Will Mitcham, speciality artist; and Maud Ross, comedienne'

1 December 1900, The Era: Empire, Leicester, review: 'Miss Ross, comedienne and top boot dancer; Will Mitcham, musical speciality artist;'

8 December 1900, The Era: Stratford Empire, London: Maud Ross is still to be found on the same bill as Will Mitcham

10 December 1900 onwards: Will and Maud at the Middlesex Music Hall

1901 - 1905

1901

17 June 1901: Empire Palace Liverpool: Featuring Maud Ross - Comedienne and Expert Dancer (programme)

1902

29 May 1902, Date of birth at 27 Hope Street, Leeds, registered by Annie Kewitsch for William Michael Kewitsch (aka Mitcham) on 4 July 1902. In his late teens, his 'mother' told him that he was actually born in Scarborough and that his real parents were music hall performers and that his father was Will Mitcham. Annie (who was also a landlady for theatricals) had been the midwife.  In the 1950s, William Michael changed his family's name to Mitcham.  William Michael Kewitsch / Mitcham is the grandfather of John Wells of this website

2 December 1902: Will and Maud appeared at the Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead (Ref GB247 STA JLC 46/44 Playbill at Special Collections Dept, Library, Glasgow Uni)

1903

24 August 1893: Jack Lorimer, comedian at the Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead. (NFA: 178R12.145 Playbill)

1904

Dunfermline Opera House: Jack Lorimer doing the new dance, the cakewalk

The Palace, Shaftesbury Avenue: Jack Lorimer

1905 - 1910

1905

?20 June 1905: Jack Lorimer

14 -19 August 1905, The Times: The Palace, London Jack Lorimer

21 August - 2 September 1905, The Times: The Palace, London Jack Lorimer

?11 December 1905: Jack Lorimer  Glasgow

1906

24-27 April 1906, The Times: The Palace, London Jack Lorimer

11 August 1906, The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times: Jack Lorimer at the Hackney Empire.

19 October 1906, The Times: The Palace, London Jack Lorimer

27 October 1906, The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times: Maud Ross is still to be found on the same bill as Will Mitcham at the Stratford Empire.

28 November 1906: John G and Maud C Lorimer, 'theatrical variety artiste', arrived in USA for first time, at New York on the 'Oceanic' from Liverpool (departure date 21 November) with £250 and no fixed destination.  Appearance: Maud was 4' 10'', dark hair, dark complexion, and blue eyes; John was  5' 4½'', dark brown hair, dark complexion, hazel eyes.

1907

3 May 1907: Jack and Mrs Lorimer arrived at Southampton from New York on the 'Celtic' en route for London.

?19/21/22/24 August 1907: Jack Lorimer , Royal Lyceum Theatre/Theatre Royal?

?19/20/21 August 1907: Stella Stahl, Theatre Royal?

25 November 1907, Ref GB 247 STA JLC P 2 Playbill: Jack Lorimer at the Palace Theatre of Varieties, London.

1908

4 May 1908, Ref GB 247 STA JLC 46/48 Playbill: Jack Lorimer at Argyle Theatre of Varieties , Birkenhead.

1909

?25/26/27 January 1909: Stella Stahl,  Empire Palace, Edinburgh?

?29 January 1909: Stella Stahl, Theatre Royal?

26 February 1909: John G Lorimer and Maud Clara Lorimer, both described as 'artiste' arrived at New York on board the 'Adriatic' from Southampton (departure 17 February).  Address of relative / friend in England: 7 Claylands Rd Clapham London

1910

?18/19 February 1910: Stella Stahl  Empire Palace?

17 May 1910, The Times: The Palace Theatre review: commented on the return of Jack Lorimer, 'comedian in kilts'

18 October 1910, The Times: The Palace Theatre: Jack Lorimer- his performance 'suggested' Harry Lauder

1911 - 1920

1911

?11 April 1911: Jack Lorimer , Lyceum?

?18 April 1911: Jack Lorimer

29 September 1911: Jack Lorrimer, artiste, and Maud Lorrimer, housewife, arrived at New York from Liverpool after travelling second-class on the 'Mauretania'.  Last permanent address was 6 Regent Rd, Gosforth (the Mitcham home address)

24 November 1911: Maud and Jack Lorimer, housewife and variety artist, arrived at Liverpool from New York on the 'Baltic'.

1912

1 July 1912: First Royal Command Performance before King George V and Queen Mary was held at the Palace Theatre, London.  Jack Lorimer was one of the stars who appeared, see no 95 on this photo

?17/18/19/20 September 1912: Jack Lorimer, Stella Stahl  Empire Palace?

1913

10 March 1913: Jack Lorimer, 'the Hielan' Laddie', Stella Stahl comedienne at Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead. (NFA: 178R12.207 Playbill)

?16/18 September 1913: Jack Lorimer

?15/16/17/19/23 September 1913: Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

1914

?14/15 September 1914: Jack Lorimer  and Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

?17 September 1914: Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

?22 September 1914: Jack Lorimer

22 October 1914: John G Lorimer, 'theatrical' and Maud C Lorimer, housewife, arrived at New York on board the 'Adriatic' from Liverpool (address given was The Wee House', contact Jeam Gillap

12 December 1914: Maud Lorimer, 'theatrical artiste', of The Wee Hoose, Endymion Road, Brixton Hill, arrived at Liverpool from New York on the 'Lusitania'.

1915

?13 April 1915: Jack Lorimer and Stella Stahl

?8/9 November 1915: Jack Lorimer and Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

?12 November 1915: Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

1916

17 January 1916: Stella Stahl in Song and Dance; Jack Lorimer, Scotch Comedian and Dancer Argyle Theatre of Varieties, Birkenhead. (NFA: 178R12.236 Playbill)

?13 June 1916: Jack Lorimer

1917

?23 January 1917: Jack Lorimer  and Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

?24/26 January 1917: Stella Stahl, Empire Palace

?20 February 1917 Alhambra Theatre, Leith: Jack Lorimer  and Stella Stahl

 

 

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